Search Results: "Jane E.M. Robinson"


BOOK REVIEW

RIDDLES IN PROVENCE by Jane E.M. Robinson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 5, 2011

"A skillful blend of passion, mystery, politics and history, set in a perfectly rendered Provence."
A woman in an unraveling marriage tries to solve her uncle's murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"A smart, tightly focused character study, by turns skeptical and generous as either is called for, of a woman worth the effort to know."
As she's portrayed here, the versatile and charismatic Mary Seacole may have been a top self-promoter, but she was also a comforter and healer of the sick and wounded, on a par with Florence Nightingale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Uncommon deeds are dimmed by the author's rambling speculations on their connections to social change. (16 pp. b&w illustrations)"
A bewildering roundup of undercelebrated females across the centuries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 8, 2010

"For die-hard Ray Charles fans only."
Unremarkable memoir of the son of music legend Ray Charles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT ROOM by E.M. Goldman
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Goldman is a rare writer who can present the story from the point-of-view of either gender; as a result, this novel will reach deep inside readers' own hopes and dreams. (Fiction. 12+)"
In a bizarre premise, seven high-school juniors take part in an experiment with virtual reality: a simulation of their ten-year reunion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 11, 2006

"A warm portrait of motherhood and the struggles of being a single parent."
From a working single mother, a colorful account of the struggles and triumphs of raising her son while maintaining her sanity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GETTING LINCOLN'S GOAT by E.M. Goldman
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Goldman (Money to Burn, 1994, etc.) has a snappy, comic style, dead-on for the genre; with a suspenseful plot, totally credible and fun characters, and enough romance to oil the works, this novel is simply a hoot. (Fiction. 10+)"
This comic mystery introduces a refreshing teen detective, Elliot Armbruster, a slightly nerdy 15-year-old who longs to be like his TV hero, Dangerous Dan McGrew. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Deadbringer by E.M. Markoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 22, 2016

"A bevy of rich characters, plot twists, and possible paths for future books."
A teenage boy who's able to summon souls and revive corpses flees with his uncle from those seeking to eliminate his kind in the first installment of debut author Markoff's fantasy series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERSONAL EFFECTS by E.M. Kokie
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"A fine addition to the literature of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. (Historical fiction. 14 & up)"
"Embrace the suck," is Matt Foster's older brother T.J.'s advice to him, and he's got a whole lot of suck to embrace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: July 1, 2005

"A strong, appealing entry in a series that is gaining momentum. (Fiction. 12+)"
A highly readable and entertaining work of fiction inspired by Jan Van Eyck's Northern Renaissance masterpiece, The Arnolfini Portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNDERSTANDING THOMAS JEFFERSON by E.M. Halliday
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Jefferson was such an enigma that studies of him are almost as numerous as the volumes in the great man's own library—but this valuable new account deserves a prominent place among them. (Illustrated throughout)"
Historian Halliday votes to keep Thomas Jefferson on Mount Rushmore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIN DEEP by E.M. Crane
ANIMALS
Released: March 11, 2008

"Still, fans of Deb Caletti and Sarah Dessen will probably enjoy it, and readers can hope that Crane's next plot lives up to her prose. (Fiction. YA)"
A thoughtful, lonely girl with a difficult mother and a fear of bullying, Andrea Anderson watches her classmates (a metaphor of stage and audience recurs throughout but doesn't quite gel) and stagnates. Read full book review >