Search Results: "Jane S. Smith"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2009

"An accessible introduction to an agricultural innovator that gives equal weight to his life of experimentation and what it has meant for society."
In-depth look at a pioneering horticulturalist and the impact of his work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOL'S GOLD by Jane S. Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"With its injoke quality, the story here will particularly entertain the intellectual and artistic elite Smith pokes fun at, but there are enough acid darts aimed at the rest of us to keep readers laughing—or at least smiling ruefully."
A first novel of high comedy about would-be artists, art theorists, and trend-setters vacationing in Provence, from an author respected for her serious nonfiction (Patenting the Sun, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARGO, YOU LUCKY DOG by Maggie S. Smith
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1994

"The clever premise is developed with bubbling good humor, especially in the many ingenious details to be discovered in the author's watercolor illustrations. (Picture book. 4-9)"
What if a dog won the lottery? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S EASTER, CHLOE ZOE! by Jane Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A pleasant but not groundbreaking effort, with a cute, yellow elephant leading the charge. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An anthropomorphic elephant girl named Chloe Zoe attends an Easter egg hunt with her two best friends and learns a lesson about sharing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S HALLOWEEN, CHLOE ZOE! by Jane Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2017

"Doesn't stand out among the many introductions to Halloween's delights. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Chloe Zoe in back, exploring Halloween's delights with her friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Done with Men Forever by S. Jane Scheyder
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"A delightful read that may make readers want to move to New England, stay in a B&B, and fall in love."
A charming romantic comedy about an unemployed woman and an ex-NFL player at odds with each other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 7, 2013

"A bizarre twist on biblical prophecy."
Mozell-Smith, who says she was told by God to write a book, shares favorite Scriptures along with some unorthodox interpretations of the Bible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAIRY DUST by Jane Denitz Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2002

"A powerful story, beguilingly told. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Ruthie and her father need someone to help out around the house while Ruthie's mother is away studying Aztec-wedding rituals in Mexico, but they seem to get more than they bargained for with the arrival of Alice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE IS MY HEART by William Jay Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Dyer contributes delicate, colored pencil drawings to the book, which is about the same size as a valentine. (index) (Poetry. 4-10)"
Smith has gathered often humorous, always amorous poems from the traditional to the new, from contributors with household names to the poetically omnipresent Anonymous. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUGGLING by Jane S. Gould
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Despite this admitted shortcoming and the occasional excess of personal information, Juggling provides an honest and insightful consideration of one courageous woman's experience."
A sobering account of women's struggle for opportunity and equality in the work force, seen through the eyes of one of the leaders in the fight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 26, 1991

"While the women in question exert a pull on the popular imagination, Smith's rewarmed capsule bios and shallow psychological speculation provide neither insight nor entertainment. (Photographs.)"
What quality do women who've had multiple attachments to famous men share? ``Ordinariness,'' theorizes Smith (Doctor's Wives, 1980, etc.) in this flimsy study: They're ``the kind of women you pass pushing shopping carts to the market.'' Famous men are concentrating emotional energy on their work, Smith says, so a woman ``who wishes to please such a man must practice tremendous self-denial...Her importance to him becomes her sole source of self-satisfaction.'' Fifteen case histories follow, put together from secondary sources and an occasional interview; few of the profiles bear out Smith's thesis. Read full book review >