Search Results: "Jane Miller"


BOOK REVIEW

UPSIDE DOWN by Mary Jane Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1992

"Relationships here are finely drawn: the difference between Adam- at-school and Adam-at-home is a sharp piece of irony, funny and subtle; Jon's role as older brother is authentically bossy and surprisingly sweet. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Sara Kovar, her older brother Jon, and their mother have managed to put her father's death last year behind them, though they all experience lingering sadness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAST FORWARD by Mary Jane Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"The prose here is merely serviceable, but many young readers will relate to Kayla's troubles. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Wouldn't it be great to fast-forward through life's bad parts? Read full book review >

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FIRST CALL: GREETING 2017 WITH TROUBLE-FRAUGHT STORIES IN HAND
by J. Kingston Pierce

There are some years when it’s pretty easy to pick out which first-quarter crime, mystery, and thriller novels are destined to become the Big Reads, those books that enjoy extraordinary promotions and generate the most word-of-mouth. Such is not the case heading into the initial three months of 2017. There are so many promising new works by so many familiar ...


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BOOK REVIEW

FLEX by Jane Hyun
NON-FICTION
Released: March 18, 2014

"Hyun and Lee offer convincing evidence to illustrate how to enhance communication skills across various workplace divides."
With the assistance of Miller, executive coaches Hyun (Breaking the Bamboo Ceiling: Career Strategies for Asians, 2005) and Lee examine how "infusing cultural proficiency initiatives into company-wide values, policies and programs achieves a demonstrable effect." Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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2016 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE FOR SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY & HORROR FANS (PART 1)
by John DeNardo

The holidays are approaching, which means it's time for family & friends, egg nog, and the annual panic of deciding what gifts to buy. But fear not! I'm here to offer up a tempting selection of gift ideas for the science fiction, fantasy, and horror fans on your gift list. 

For fans who are avid fiction readers ...


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BOOK REVIEW

RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Attractively designed and handsomely illustrated, this informative text introduces teens to many intriguing angles on a high-interest topic that should inspire many to further explore the subject. (chronology, glossary, bibliography, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)"
Will the world end in a bang or a whimper? Unless pre-empted by human-induced disaster or one of many scientifically possible catastrophic scenarios, life on Earth will end a billion years from now in a sizzle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE DOES IT GO? by Margaret Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 16, 1992

``Where does Tavo put his socks? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOO MOO IN A TUTU by Tim Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2017

"Neither too-too funny nor too-too original. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Can a cow jeté and plié? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECYCLING DAY by Edward Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2014

"Sure to inspire a new generation of recyclers. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Three insects and a worm learn about recycling when their vacant lot gets cleaned up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Glossary (somewhat sketchy); selected facts; bibliography. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Using stories of individuals and families to illuminate important events and aspects of the Alaskan experience, the Millers subtly convey the message that there is still great opportunity there. Read full book review >