Search Results: "Janell Cannon"


BOOK REVIEW

PINDULI by Janell Cannon
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Preachy, but Cannon fans will lap it up. (Picture book. 5-8)"
After being ridiculed for her big ears, her fuzzy fur, and her uneven stripes, a little hyena tries to change herself into something else, but learns an amazing secret about the power of words to hurt and to heal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE YAU by Janell Cannon
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"As is her wont, Cannon pairs a wordy but uncomplicated adventure to whimsical, technically accomplished art—giving readers of both simple and sophisticated taste something to appreciate. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Cannon revisits the reclusive, catlike Fuzzheads introduced in Trupp (1999), for an offbeat rite-of-passage tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUPP by Janell Cannon
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1995

"By reproducing this effect so powerfully, Cannon creates a unique reading experience. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Trupp, a white, furry, catlike animal from a mythical, mountainous region, decides to see the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRICKWING by Janell Cannon
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Readers may not lose their aversion to cockroaches, even with the author's informative, appreciative closing notes, but they'll enjoy the adventure. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Continuing in the lapidary visual style that made hits of Stellaluna (1993) and Verdi (1997), Cannon illustrates this tale of a hard-luck jungle cockroach with exquisitely detailed and realistic ground-level views that seem to glow from within. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STELLALUNA by Janell Cannon
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Delightful and informative but never didactic: a splendid debut. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Attacked by an owl, Stellaluna (a fruit bat) is separated from her mother and taken in by a bird and her nestlings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VERDI by Janell Cannon
by Janell Cannon, illustrated by Janell Cannon
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"An afterword provides sufficient information on snakes to appease those in search of deeper knowledge. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Cannon (Trupp, 1995, etc.) strikes a fragile balance between fact and fiction in her presentation of Verdi, a very small, bright yellow python who does not want to grow up into the adult snakes he knows: green, boring, and rude. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEP RIGHT UP by Donna Janell Bowman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2016

"An incredible story that ought to be widely known—a must-read. (Picture book/biography. 7-12)"
Minter's acrylic-painted linoleum-block prints combine with Bowman's story of a former slave who trained a brilliant horse for a memorable book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOSER’S GUIDE TO LIFE AND LOVE by A.E. Cannon
FICTION
Released: July 1, 2008

"Mediocrity of storytelling aside, the romantic tension is palpable, there is a Shakespearean climax replete with costumes and kissing, and thus-inclined readers will find here at least a few hours of satisfying, if fleeting, romance. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Ed not only has to wear a frilly tuxedo to his job at Reel Life Movies video and DVD rental, he's got a hand-me-down nametag. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An imaginatively wrought, steampunk-influenced feminist adventure."
In Cannon's alternative version of early-20th-century London, an invisible spy walks the streets, airships are a preferred form of travel, and two rival explorers join forces to learn who is trying to kill them and why. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEON ALIENS ATE MY HOMEWORK by Nick Cannon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A collection well-suited to young boys of color as well as all young fans of hip-hop culture, who often long for family-friendly content. (Poetry. 7-10)"
What if Shel Silverstein grew up on hip-hop? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"As indispensable as it is incomplete. (Author tour)"
This reporter's ambitious reconstruction of the Rodney King case presents a sobering image, not just of Los Angeles, but of judicial mayhem and political exploitation. Read full book review >