Search Results: "Janet Asimov"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1986

"As usual, the Asimovs have crowded history, science, and a good yarn into a few short pages."
Another romp, fifth in the series, involving Norby the time-twisting robot and his human friends, Jeff, Fargo, and Albany, by sci-fi icon Asimov and his wife Janet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORBY AND THE TERRIFIED TAXI by Janet Asimov
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Where others in the series were lighthearted and clever, this one is hokey and banal—and some parts make no sense at all. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In this 11th entry in the Norby series (Norby and the Court Jester, 1991, and the others were collaborations with Isaac Asimov), cadet Jeff Wells and his amazing robot, Norby, encounter an alien device called the Connector. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1987

"For the more jaded reader, it will seem offhand and superficial."
Pointers for established, novice and would-be writers by a very successful one and his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORBY AND THE COURT JESTER by Janet Asimov
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"Part old-fashioned Saturday movie serial, part G&S operetta, and all preposterous: good, clean fun, and the loose ends can go into another book. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In the tenth book about Jeff Wells and his appealing little robot, Norby, the two careen through time and space yet again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUY JUPITER AND OTHER STORIES by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 5, 1975

"Rain, Rain, Go Away' (a what's-with-the-family-next-door variant) click; most of the other 22 are pretty thin."
We are apparently destined to see the entire Asimov oeuvre recycled between hard covers in our lifetime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUMAN BODY by Isaac Asimov
Released: Feb. 28, 1963

"For those hypochondriacal theme writers who always pick some anatomical obscurity, Asimov goes from impacted wisdom teeth to ingrown toenails."
Limb by limb, organ by organ, occasionally cell by cell, Asimov describes man in terms of his chemical and structural nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUASAR, QUASAR, BURNING BRIGHT by Isaac Asimov
NON-FICTION
Released: April 7, 1978

"Leave it to Asimov to supply such figures, along with familiar comparisons and ingenious analogies, which together make the revelations of science wondrous and never tedious."
Another Asimov Anthology, this one of pieces that appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 23, 1978

"Brisk—if you feel that the Apple flavoring warrants the new line."
. . . or All Around the Town with Encyclopedia Brown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CASEBOOK OF THE BLACK WIDOWERS by Isaac Asimov
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 4, 1979

"So these are stories for a very limited audience—those with a taste for miniature game-playing, eager (but not genuinely erudite) dinner conversation, and Asimov's incorrigible verbal playfulness."
The third collection of Asimov's "Black Widowers" stories from Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine—each tale consisting of 90% talk as the yakky Widowers discuss a crime puzzle over their fancy club dinners; as Asimov admits, "the mysteries, as mysteries, can be described, discussed, and solved in about a quarter of the space I devote to each." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 20, 1964

Reference-reading book which gives short biographical sketches of some 000 scientists from the earliest times to the present, evaluates their contributions, and also relates their work to the development of the various sciences all over the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 7, 1973

"118), to rediscover with the ancients."
Numerals, not numbers, are the subject of this survey of how man gradually developed handier words and symbols to express "how many." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASIMOV ON PHYSICS by Isaac Asimov
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1976

"But after all the man doesn't pretend to write anything but mass-produced popular science—and he can't be beat at it."
Of making many books there is no end, saith the Preacher, and he never even met Isaac Asimov. Read full book review >