Search Results: "Janet Asimov"


BOOK REVIEW

NORBY AND THE TERRIFIED TAXI by Janet Asimov
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Where others in the series were lighthearted and clever, this one is hokey and banal—and some parts make no sense at all. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In this 11th entry in the Norby series (Norby and the Court Jester, 1991, and the others were collaborations with Isaac Asimov), cadet Jeff Wells and his amazing robot, Norby, encounter an alien device called the Connector. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1987

"For the more jaded reader, it will seem offhand and superficial."
Pointers for established, novice and would-be writers by a very successful one and his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORBY AND THE COURT JESTER by Janet Asimov
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"Part old-fashioned Saturday movie serial, part G&S operetta, and all preposterous: good, clean fun, and the loose ends can go into another book. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In the tenth book about Jeff Wells and his appealing little robot, Norby, the two careen through time and space yet again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1986

"As usual, the Asimovs have crowded history, science, and a good yarn into a few short pages."
Another romp, fifth in the series, involving Norby the time-twisting robot and his human friends, Jeff, Fargo, and Albany, by sci-fi icon Asimov and his wife Janet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUY JUPITER AND OTHER STORIES by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 5, 1975

"Rain, Rain, Go Away' (a what's-with-the-family-next-door variant) click; most of the other 22 are pretty thin."
We are apparently destined to see the entire Asimov oeuvre recycled between hard covers in our lifetime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 7, 1973

"118), to rediscover with the ancients."
Numerals, not numbers, are the subject of this survey of how man gradually developed handier words and symbols to express "how many." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUASAR, QUASAR, BURNING BRIGHT by Isaac Asimov
NON-FICTION
Released: April 7, 1978

"Leave it to Asimov to supply such figures, along with familiar comparisons and ingenious analogies, which together make the revelations of science wondrous and never tedious."
Another Asimov Anthology, this one of pieces that appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 18, 1973

"The pages on dinosaurs themselves, after the usual mention of Mary Anning who found the first ichthyosaur and plesiosaur remains, is simply a rundown on the size, names, build and eating habits of a few of the better known species — and as such surely superfluous."
This is the fourth volume in Asimov's "How Did We Find Out. . ." series which aims at reader participation in the process of discovery, but there is nothing in his lackluster survey of fossil finds and dinosaur features to stimulate any kind of mental activity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FANTASTIC VOYAGE II by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 18, 1987

"It slips down easily enough but leaves no lingering impression."
Not a sequel to the original Fantastic Voyage (a 1966 movie novelization), which Asimov chooses to ignore completely; the upshot isn't too much more than a sclerotically talky retread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 9, 1978

"At half the length and with half the schmaltz, this 200th Asimov title would have been distinctly more memorable."
What happens when an overachiever with almost perfect recall is let loose on autobiography? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE? by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 16, 1971

"Please."

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 25, 1980

"Asimov, ever admirable if exasperating, ends the book on the rebound, pounds lighter, and enthusiastic over projects to come—including (you guessed it) a fulfillment of the book's last line: 'To be continued.'"
The second volume of Asimov's blockbuster autobiography (begun with In Memory Yet Green, 1979) picks him up at age 34, teaching biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine and under fire as a sci-fi sensation, and leaves him, at 58, the Compleat Science Writer, dubbed by George Gaylord Simpson "a natural wonder and a natural resource." Read full book review >