Search Results: "Janet Buell"


BOOK REVIEW

SAIL AWAY, LITTLE BOAT by Janet Buell
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2006

"Deeply respectful of the places where man and nature meet, this is a serene journey of beauty. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In this illustrated rhyme, readers follow a toy boat's journey from brook to ocean. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPITAL OFFENSES by Samuel Buell
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A book that will challenge conventional wisdom among readers who intuitively believe that corporations often game the system."
The federal prosecutor for the massive Enron investigation examines why corporations and their executives rarely face criminal charges, no matter how widespread their hurtful conduct. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DREAM OF THE GREAT AMERICAN NOVEL by Lawrence Buell
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 3, 2014

"Although readers will encounter many usually canonized suspects, Buell's scope is wide enough to encompass the varieties of novelists' imaginations and to consider the implications of multiculturalism and globalism in redefining the future of American fiction."
A history and investigation of a literary concept that has "refused to die." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"In the end, though, it all feels a little sad, and Buell has the smarts to know it: 'I wanted to make others happy more than I wanted to make myself happy.'"
A name-dropping memoir ("I had a similar experience with Salvador Dalí") by the ex-model who became lover and muse to a 30-year stretch of American glitterati. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUDINI by Janet Pedersen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Emotionally and artistically, it's Houdini's perspective, with his earnest exuberance, that steals the show. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Houdini the caterpillar is destined for greatness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUDREY AND BARBARA by Janet Lawson
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2002

"Of course. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Audrey wants to go to India. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PINO AND THE SIGNORA’S PASTA by Janet Pedersen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"The Rome setting won't matter to kids because they'll focus on Pino's escapades, which are the spice in the sauce here. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Pedersen dishes up a tale about the homeless cats in Rome, the Signora who feeds them pasta and one grande gatto who wants a special meal that will make him purr like music. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DELICIOUS BUG by Janet Perlman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Bright and appealing. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A deadlock between two chameleons disrupts the forest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HONEY OF A DAY by Janet Marshall
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 2000

"A clever idea, but one that is unsuccessfully executed. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A host of wild animals attends the wedding of two bears set among the abundant wildflowers that have inspired this story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BANANA MOON by Janet Marshall
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 1998

"The pages of the book are thick and coated, making them durable and easy for small fingers to turn. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Marshall (Look Once, Look Twice, 1995, etc.) uses die-cut illustrations as a tease, for objects glimpsed on the other side of a hole are not what they appear: Candy canes turn out to be the sails of sailboats, and salt-water taffy is transformed into the whorls of a turtle's shell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOK ONCE, LOOK TWICE by Janet Marshall
ABC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 1995

"But the guessing game is fun, and may encourage children to look more closely at patterns in everyday life. (Picture book. 3-5)"
The bold colors, sharp graphics, and pure design of this alphabet book will nab children's attention initially, but the ideas beyond that first look may confuse even older readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTH FLIGHT by Janet Edwards
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Despite an exciting and complex plot, far less special than the first two. (Science fiction. 11-16)"
In this far-future trilogy's conclusion, a disabled archaeology student-cum-military hero deciphers an alien probe. Read full book review >