Search Results: "Janet Frame"


BOOK REVIEW

BETWEEN MY FATHER AND THE KING by Janet Frame
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 2013

"A powerful collection."
A treasure-trove of stories, from the very earliest she ever published, to work published posthumously, from the late, great Frame. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE MEMORIAL ROOM by Janet Frame
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 10, 2013

"Brilliant."
A strange, resonant, Nabokov-ian novel about the plight of Harry Gill, a New Zealand writer on a six-month fellowship in France, struggling to write his first imaginative fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WOMAN OF JUDAH by Ronald Frame
Released: May 1, 1989

In a novella and stories, Frame(Sandmouth. 1987; Winter Journey, 1986) explores the role of the storyteller (or artist) as voyeur and the enigma of real—as opposed to socially observable—personality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PENELOPE'S HAT by Ronald Frame
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Beautifully written, almost musical story of a woman's journey from childhood to old age trying to find clarity in a muffled world that makes its point by what it does not say."
A woman novelist—never certain who she and others are, both a product and an observer of the English middle class notorious for preferring appearances to the truth—kindles the imagination in Frame's haunting new novel (A Woman of Judah, 1989; Sandmouth, 1987; Winter Journey, 1986). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAVISHAM by Ronald Frame
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"An intelligently imagined Dickens prequel."
Frame (The Lantern Bearers, 2001, etc.) writes the story of Catherine Havisham, recluse of Satis House, in this prelude to Charles Dickens' Great Expectations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LANTERN BEARERS by Ronald Frame
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Aside from some contrivance in the matter of Bone's untimely end, this is a tale of great richness and subtlety, equally evocative whether dealing with adolescent turmoil or the small-town '60s milieu."
A lilting, gentle story—last year's Scottish Book of the Year—of a boy's sexual awakening into a world of music in 1962, as he falls for the young composer who's hired him to sing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUDINI by Janet Pedersen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Emotionally and artistically, it's Houdini's perspective, with his earnest exuberance, that steals the show. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Houdini the caterpillar is destined for greatness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUDREY AND BARBARA by Janet Lawson
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2002

"Of course. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Audrey wants to go to India. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PINO AND THE SIGNORA’S PASTA by Janet Pedersen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"The Rome setting won't matter to kids because they'll focus on Pino's escapades, which are the spice in the sauce here. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Pedersen dishes up a tale about the homeless cats in Rome, the Signora who feeds them pasta and one grande gatto who wants a special meal that will make him purr like music. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTH FLIGHT by Janet Edwards
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Despite an exciting and complex plot, far less special than the first two. (Science fiction. 11-16)"
In this far-future trilogy's conclusion, a disabled archaeology student-cum-military hero deciphers an alien probe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAULT LINE by Janet Tashjian
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"While not quite as insightful as Sarah Dessen's Dreamland (2000), this should find a place in all libraries that serve teens, many of whom will recognize aspects of their own relationships in Becky and Kip's. (Fiction. YA)"
Senior Becky Martin, who has a loving family, a terrific best friend, and good grades, is slowly making a place for herself in San Francisco's stand-up comedy scene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWISTS AND TURNS by Janet McDonald
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 15, 2003

"It's a shame, because McDonald's message to kids—find a talent, then work hard to achieve a goal—is one that can't be stated too often. (Fiction. 12-14)"
After graduating from high school, sisters Keeba and Teesha Washington decide to turn their talent for hair-braiding into a business and open a beauty shop. Read full book review >