Search Results: "Janet Wilson"


BOOK REVIEW

OUR RIGHTS by Janet Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2013

"A useful, if not artful awareness tool. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
An introduction to the positive action kids are taking globally to improve the lives of children everywhere. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUR HEROES by Janet Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"An admirable effort to engage today's youth. (websites) (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
In this third offering about young activists, Wilson takes a look at true stories of children who are giving and helping worldwide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AT GRANDPA'S SUGAR BUSH by Margaret Carney
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Ever so appealing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Carney's debut is a paean to sugaring season, that yearly celebration of early spring in the north. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JESS WAS THE BRAVE ONE by Jean Little
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1992

"Told with vigor and gentle humor, an unusually fresh look at a perennially interesting theme. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Jess loves thunderstorms and can be counted on to take a strange dog in stride; her older sister Claire—blessed with what her dad terms ``an overactive imagination''—``bleats'' at a tree's windy heights and anticipates a shot as ``a dagger,'' not the ``mosquito bite'' the doctor promises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOPHER TAKES HEART by Virginia Scribner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Matthew (``Gopher'') Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOLOMON’S TREE by Andrea Spalding
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"They have collaborated on two other works; this is perhaps the most successful. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Many Cedar trees surround Solomon's house, but it's the maple tree that he climbs each day and it's the maple tree that hears his secrets and thoughts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REVENGE OF THE SMALL SMALL by Jean Little
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"Another solidly entertaining family story from this fine Canadian author. (Picture book/Young reader. 4-8)"
Though her older sister and brothers tease her relentlessly, Patsy Small is magnanimous: when they have chicken pox, she brings Jim drinks, loans Jane her favorite book, and gives Hugo a toy for his hamster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO BE COOL IN THE THIRD GRADE by Betsy Duffey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Robbie's somewhat overstated aim is to create a new image for himself by taking steps like avoiding his mother's company on the way to the bus stop each morning, trading in his superhero underwear for plain white, and getting jeans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SELINA AND THE BEAR PAW QUILT by Barbara Smucker
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1996

"Still, Selena's sorrow over leaving her home and grandmother will be plain to all. (Picture book. 4-9)"
The dilemma of a Mennonite family during America's Civil War is the subject of this charmingly designed book, which features quilted borders and intricate cloth patterns in the illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"That it is also a beautiful book only expands its appeal. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8+)"
The 16 lines John McCrae wrote following a friend's death in the Second Battle of Ypres in 1915 survived and flourished in the insanity of WW I, and in this work, continue to evince the same sturdy beauty as do the scarlet poppies blowing in Flanders fields. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GADGET WAR by Betsy Duffey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-10)"
When Albert Einstein Jones joins Kelly's third grade, it's ``hate at first sight'': proud of her status as class inventor, Kelly meets his competitive zeal with rancor that escalates as each attacks the other with not-so-ingenious pranks involving smelly goo, food catapults, etc. But when the orange that Kelly slings at Albert hits the principal by mistake, the resourceful Albert covers for her—with the unexpected result that he gets the blame. Read full book review >