Search Results: "Janice Dean"


BOOK REVIEW

FREDDY THE FROGCASTER AND THE HUGE HURRICANE by Janice Dean
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 13, 2015

"Common-sense attitude and advice, sunnily conveyed. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Budding weatherfrog Freddy makes his television debut as a hurricane roars over Lilypad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTES ON EXTINCTION by Janice Deaner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 12, 2001

"A smart, well-composed study of the perilous nature of survival."
Tragedy and redemption, sorrow and longing: the motifs of extinction are woven together in this thoughtful third novel from Deaner (The Body Spoken, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BODY SPOKEN by Janice Deaner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1999

"Oddly compelling, if flawed."
Deaner's arresting second novel (Where Blue Begins, 1993), in its dreamy way, takes on gender, power, and the frailty of truth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE BLUE BEGINS by Janice Deaner
Released: March 11, 1993

"Still, a writer to watch."
A dark legacy of family secrets is exposed anticlimactically- -in this first novel of uneven promise from young filmmaker Deaner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDDY THE FROGCASTER AND THE TERRIBLE TORNADO by Janice Dean
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2016

"Best read for its informational content. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Freddy the Frogcaster learns about tornadoes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Freddy the Frogcaster and the Big Blizzard by Janice Dean
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"A fitting sequel to Freddy's original adventure, packed with facts accompanied by cheerful illustrations."
Snow, snow, and more snow. What's a frog to do? Dean's (Freddy the Frogcaster, 2013) irrepressible amphibian puts his weather-safety skills to good use in this snowy sequel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDDY THE FROGCASTER by Janice Dean
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"The forecast is for frequent checkouts for Freddy during weather-study units. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A weather-loving frog finds a forecasting career in his future after he saves the town picnic. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

NOTHING LIKE APRIL OR PARIS
by Bobbi Dumas

Yay! April’s here!

There’s something special about April, with its exuberant celebration of spring—flowers blooming, trees blossoming, leaves unfurling, reaching for the sun.

I can appreciate that feeling, and love that this is the time of year when we can step outside and tilt our faces up to the sky and feel the warmth of the season on our skin ...


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BLOG POST

EXTRA! EXTRA! READ ALL ABOUT IT!
by Leila Roy

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
—First Amendment to the United States Constitution

 

As I’m sure we’ve all noticed, certain ...


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BOOK REVIEW

GOING THROUGH THE CHANGE by Janice Daugharty
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 12, 1994

"Often grim, though not without periodic comic relief, Daugharty's pieces explore the vast range and complexity of human experience with fearlessness, honesty, and compassion."
Working in the tradition of Flannery O'Connor and William Faulkner, the author of Dark of the Moon (not reviewed) finds her own, surprisingly fresh perspective. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NECESSARY LIES by Janice Daugharty
Released: March 29, 1995

"Problematic, but perhaps a necessary stage in the development of an interesting young writer."
A bleak tale tinged with humor, but sometimes bordering on caricature, of a poor, pregnant girl in the South. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY OF GATES by Janice Elliott
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"Admirers of Elliott's teasing wit and wisdom will find more here."
English writer Elliott, a necromancer who dangles metaphysical concepts of Time, Love, and the Divine plus other headachy abstractions, sets her latest morality playground in the ancient city of Jerusalem—a cat's cradle of invisible lines ``ever- shifting between faith and non-faith and wrong faith, past and present, fantasy and the impossibility of truth.'' As in Elliott's Dr. Gruber's Daughter (1988), events and characters circle around a boardinghouse—here, that of Eugenia Muna, for whom Time is a loop (Mohammed on his flying fanciful steed was a lovely sight; Proust's diet was irritating; and Freud was on for a brief visit) and who cooks (like Countess Olga in Gruber) awful offal, but she will leave earth's carrion, at the close, to cook a sacred carp, which, it is said, harbors souls. Read full book review >