Search Results: "Janice Steinberg"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TIN HORSE by Janice Steinberg
Released: Jan. 29, 2013

"Despite raising provocative questions about twinship, Jewish identity, family roles and betrayal, Steinberg's attempt to combine a heartstring pulling, realistic family saga and film-noirish mystery-solving feels unsatisfying and slightly bipolar."
Suspense writer Steinberg (Death in a City of Mystics, 1998, etc.) folds a missing person mystery into a Jewish multigenerational family history set in Boyle Heights, once a distinctly Jewish neighborhood in Los Angeles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAUL STEINBERG by Deirdre Bair
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 20, 2012

"Followers of the postwar art world will love this book but may be disappointed by the lack of examples of his work."
National Book Award winner Bair (Calling It Quits: Late-Life Divorce and Starting Over, 2007, etc.) exhaustively explores everything related to Steinberg. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNCLE JANICE by Matt Burgess
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Is it possible that Burgess is doing for Queens what Junot Diaz is doing for New Jersey? No easy answer just yet, but this novel will make you wait for one to show up."
The multicultural stew pot that is contemporary Queens is served up steaming in this pungently uproarious novel about a frenzied young policewoman advancing her career one drug buy at a time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RITES & WRONGS OF JANICE WILLS by Joanna Pearson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: July 1, 2011

"Serve to readers who like their chick lit with a side of humor. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Who better to study adolescent behavior than Janice Wills, a budding anthropologist and teenager herself? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A practical, solidly researched and documented parents'-eye view of adolescence."
A sensible analysis of the turmoil that adolescence triggers within parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOTHAM UNBOUND by Ted Steinberg
NON-FICTION
Released: June 3, 2014

"Richly researched and illustrated—a wholly edifying account."
Steinberg (History and Law/Case Western Reserve Univ.; American Green: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Lawn, 2006, etc.) returns with an illuminating text that adheres strictly and powerfully to its subtitle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 16, 2002

"Puts human faces on the often impersonal and obscure college-admissions process."
New York Times education reporter Steinberg demonstrates that character is not always fate for the students who apply to elite Wesleyan University. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRY OF THE LEOPARD by Alan Steinberg
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"In this case, the nature of the beast just isn't that interesting."
An occasionally imaginative and more frequently turgid first novel by a poet-playwright whose verbal skills can't disguise the fact that his half-human protagonist is an all-too-familiar melodramatic type. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"A mixed bag. Relating his occasionally amusing adventures in breezy slang, Steinberg seems to be vying for the same audience that has made Broadway's Book of Mormon such a huge hit."
A search for the roots of Mormonism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 19, 2011

"The author does not provide deeper insight into the nature of human endurance, but anyone dreaming of completing a triathlon or just seeking to get off the couch and into better shape will find inspiration here."
New York Times reporter Steinberg (The Gatekeepers: Inside the Admissions Process of a Premier College, 2002) tells the stories of six ordinary people's attempts to complete an Ironman triathlon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Apparently undertaken as a textbook, Steinberg's accessible survey will prove useful as a reference for green-inclined readers in and out of school."
American history began not with Columbus's landing, Jamestown, or even the peopling of the continent by PaleoIndians from Asia, but 180 million years ago, when the supercontinent called Pangaea began to disintegrate. Read full book review >