Search Results: "Jason Robert Brown"


BOOK REVIEW

BROWN by Richard Rodriguez
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2002

"Elegant, controversial, and altogether memorable."
A poetic, often contrarian meditation on race in modern America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

13 by Jason Robert Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2008

"By the end, Evan's Bar Mitzvah has gone well, a sign that he is leaving the 'mishegoss' about being cool and popular behind him. (Fiction. 10-14)"
"No one said becoming a man was easy," Rabbi Weiner tells Evan Goldman during preparations for his Bar Mitzvah. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TICKETY TOCK by Jason Robert Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"However enjoyable it sounds aloud, however, its message—of the value of second chances and stopping to live life in the now—seems aimed more at adults than children. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Tailor Schmuel learned to make time useful, to work and not stop "until that old clock says so!" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN by James Polster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"Good fun, if ultimately shallow."
A rollicking, at times extremely funny, tall tale disguised as a detective novel, careening with Hunter Thompsonesque panache through the restaurants, bars, and haunts of the corrupt rich in San Francisco, that classic mystery milieu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVING JASON by Michael Sears
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"You don't need a background in economics to get drawn into this thriller, but it probably helps."
Sophisticated sleuth Jason Stafford gets drawn into a mysterious corporate takeover plot in Sears' (Long Way Down, 2015, etc.) latest high-finance thriller.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASON & KYRA by Dana Davidson
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2004

"Suffering without a strong story or inspired writing, Davidson's debut misses its mark. (Fiction. 12+)"
An improbable romance blossoms between two African-American students: Jason Vincent, basketball star and one of the most popular guys in school, and intelligent, but inexperienced Kyra Evans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASON RAT-A-TAT by Colby Rodowsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2002

With some help from a perceptive grandpa, the unathletic middle child in a sports-centered family finds his bliss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS by Robert Byrd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A fine first introduction to an age-old tale of travel, adventure, and heroism. (Mythology. 6-9)"
Murder, intrigue, betrayal, patricide, regicide, and more constitute Jason's epic quest for the Golden Fleece. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"For committed conservative Christian audiences. (Christian science fiction. 12 & up)"
An imaginative science-fiction premise and a well-drawn, affecting character struggle to overcome heavy-handed religious proselytizing in this uneven suspense tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOYAGE WITH JASON by Ken Catran
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 25, 2006

"This first U.S. edition of an award-winner will please fans of tales featuring manly men and courageous deeds. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Kiwi author Catran offers a melodramatic retelling of Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece, seen through the eyes of a cabin boy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASON AND THE BARD by Kate Gilmore
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"Few readers will have enough familiarity with Shakespeare to enjoy the verbal sparring and the angst; those who do know him aren't likely to have much patience with the rest of the story. (Fiction. 12+)"
A third from Gilmore (Enter Three Witches, 1990) depicts the players behind a Shakespeare festival—eager neophytes, egotistical professional actors, feuding directors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRIVING THE HEART by Jason Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1999

"New wine that needs aging: overwritten, ponderous, and crammed with the sorts of platitudes (—It seems that what we know makes us sad and what we don—t know is who we are—) that only undergraduates could find profound."
A debut collection of 13 stories, most of them portraying the unhappy domestic life of contemporary Americans. Read full book review >