Search Results: "Jean Charlot"


BOOK REVIEW

A CHILD'S GOOD NIGHT BOOK by Jean Charlot
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Aug. 15, 1951

"Board."
A gentle, rhythmic text, in the somnolent style for which this author is well-known, tells the sleepy-stories of friendly animals and machines in a lovely book designed to ease heavy-lidded toddlers to sleep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECRET OF THE ANDES by Ann Nolan Clark
Released: March 7, 1952

"Miss Clark's skill as a story teller, as interpreter of Indian feelings, mountain feelings, dramatic contrasts between the age of Inca civilization and the newness of the modern world, are put to much better use at this age level than at the younger, though her marked immersion in the genre, the interpolation of Incan songs and myths, the whole idyllic quality, may still be a bit hard to take."
The Inca boy, Cusi, and his search for a family are portrayed in a story that is crystal clear as the cold mountain waters, as ethereally expressed as the morning air that softens the tips of the Andes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MYSTERIOUS COLLECTION OF DR. DAVID HARLEYSON by Jean Cassels
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"However, the implication that readers can themselves solve the bulk of the mystery is misleading and may cause some disappointment. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Clever gouache paintings and lovely, attractive design can't save this beckoning "mystery" from a fundamental problem: despite an invitation to help solve it, readers don't have much left to do after the characters do their work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YONDERFEL’S CASTLE by Jean Gralley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"The result is a dry twist on a universal truth: Truly, no good deed goes unpunished. (Picture book. 5-9)"
King Yonderfel was once revered for his generous spirit; he beckoned all travelers to visit until his castle overflowed with guests. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS NOT A BOOK by Jean Jullien
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 2016

"A decidedly mixed bag of ideas that does not quite come together. (Board book. 3-5)"
This unusual board book is a visual ode to both the rectangular and things that open and close. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEFORE & AFTER by Jean Jullien
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 13, 2017

"Older preschoolers maturing from concrete thinking to more abstract thought will find this a hoot. (Board book. 3-5)"
Whimsical illustrations challenge young readers to go beyond the obvious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHUPACABRA by Jean Flitcroft
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2014

"Scary and informative. (Horror. 10-12)"
An Irish teenager's Mexican vacation takes a turn for the terrifying. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BETWEEN by Jean Thesman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 20, 2002

"Ably done, but without the spark of The Other Ones (1999). (Fiction. 11-13)"
Thesman (Sea So Far, 2001, etc.) proposes an inglorious take on human origins in this tale of a teenager caught between an array of magical creatures protecting one of the last "Darkwoods" on earth, and Hunters bent on destroying it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLOW AND TWIG by Jean Little
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"Emotionally absorbing, with a somewhat convenient ending, but satisfying all the same. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A sad and unfortunate situation of child abandonment and abuse is turned around in a consuming story that offers realism, hope, and psychological fortitude. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE HOUSE OF THE QUEEN’S BEASTS by Jean Thesman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"A great read, sure to appeal to middle-school readers. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Fourteen-year-old Emily Shepherd's life has just gotten better: she and her family have moved away from the school where Emily was ostracized for a facial scar sustained many years ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RISING TIDE by Jean Thesman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Susceptible readers will come to admire both of these young women, and be swept along on their emotional currents. (Fiction. 11-13)"
In a multi-stranded sequel to A Sea So Far (2001), Kate Keely returns to San Francisco two years after the Great Earthquake, determined to build a new and independent life in a male-dominated society. Read full book review >