Search Results: "Jean Fritz"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 18, 1958

"Throughout this collection the intent of the author is obviously to convey that warmth and compassion which has made Schweitzer one of the best known personalities of the missionary world."
Doctor Schweitzer's relationship to the great variety of animals with which he surrounds himself is the topic of this pleasant collection of vignettes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHINA HOMECOMING by Michael Fritz
FICTION
Released: April 5, 1985

"The likeliest audience, though, consists of youngsters or adults taken with Homesick—who will share Fritz's satisfaction in her warm welcome, in no longer feeling the 'outsider' and being able to call Hankou her hometown. (Below the relatively bland anecdotal/informational surface are some subtle sociocultural dynamics.)"
As she relates in her fictionalized childhood memoir, Homesick, Fritz grew up in China yearning for the America she had never seen; here, 55 years after her departure at age 13, she returns—and finds, in a Hankou transformed, a few shards of her past: "China was not only part of me. . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT'S THE BIG IDEA, BEN FRANKLIN? by Jean Fritz
Released: July 1, 1976

"Not all of Franklin by a long shot—but a cheerful, piquant first meeting."
The "Big Idea" was the connection between lightning and electricity, though Ben Franklin later played his part in advocating still another—American independence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1981

Continuing the move, begun with Stonewall (1979), from her delightful founding-father sketches to a somewhat older, straighter, and fuller biography, Fritz has made another lively, readable life story from far less personable material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREAT LITTLE MADISON by Jean Fritz
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 27, 1989

"An excellent, fascinating, indispensable resource."
A vivid portrait of the small man with a small voice who was the first to arrive at the Constitutional Convention in 1787, as well as the last survivor of that august body when he died in 1836—and who played perhaps the most vital, central role in US history in the years between. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, ADAM by Jean Fritz
Released: Oct. 30, 1963

"The world of brine and foam and the hot green land of sweet, harvested hay are carved out in detail to form strong backgrounds for a clearly plotted, well written adventure story."
Though born a whaler's son, Adam Crane did not feel the call of the salt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

121 PUDDING STREET by Jean Fritz
Released: Nov. 14, 1955

"Small plots and counterplots foil Miss Pursey's attempt to buy it back again when she returns from Zanzibar."
This light comedy has little more to it than a gratifying triumph over the whims of a fussy old lady but there are concurrent doings that trip the fantastic in a pleasurable sort of way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRADY by Jean Fritz
FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 1960

"MPSLUGMRS Fritz has written an exciting, yet tender, chronicle of the boy, his home, and his times."
To know when to keep quiet can keep a boy out of a lot of trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST COLONY OF ROANOKE by Jean Fritz
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2004

"The history-as-mystery format will appeal to young historians. (Nonfiction. 8+)"
In 1585, Queen Elizabeth and Sir Walter Raleigh supported an English settlement on Roanoke Island, between Cape Hatteras and Virginia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 2, 1992

"A winner. (Biography/Picture book. 5-9)"
An ebullient collaboration between the fine historian whose many books include Where Do You Think You're Going, Christopher Columbus? (1981) and one of America's favorite illustrators. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FISH HEAD by Jean Fritz
Kirkus Star
by Jean Fritz, illustrated by Marc Simont
Released: June 15, 1954

"Fairly firm stitching."
A tough specimen, habituee of the wharf, Fish Head is a cat with an enviable personality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"Though Jakoubek's Harriet Beecher Stowe (1989) is a more detailed source for Harriet's writings and later life, this makes livelier reading and presents a coherent, well-knit view of the Beechers' place in our country's history. (Biography. 10-13)"
The tale of this prominent, brilliant, dangerously high-strung family (two brothers committed suicide) makes a compelling American saga. Read full book review >