Search Results: "Jean-François Dumont"


BOOK REVIEW

EDGAR WANTS TO BE ALONE by Jean-François Dumont
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 9, 2015

"Best shared with preschoolers just learning irony. (Picture book. 6-8)"
An ill-tempered rat's efforts to shake off a supposed stalker ultimately take a biting, satiric twist. Literally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHEEP GO ON STRIKE by Jean-François Dumont
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 27, 2014

"Dumont's lesson can run shallow or deep, but it is a winner either way. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When the sheep go on strike, this French farmyard finds a national tradition has crossed species. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHICKENS BUILD A WALL by Jean-François Dumont
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"A beautiful picture book, with an unexpected, yet profound, something to take away. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A bunch of deluded clucks build a protective wall that is anything but. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GEESE MARCH IN STEP by Jean-François Dumont
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"A jazzy, eye-catching take on the ancient beat of the distant drummer. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Zita, an innocently precocious gosling, can't find common ground with the tradition of marching in step down to the pond in the morning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM A BEAR by Jean-François Dumont
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A naked appeal to sentiment—but also to sympathy. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A sensitive portrait of a lonely, homeless…bear, sort of. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MEMORY OF AN ELEPHANT by Sophie Strady
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 13, 2014

"Bananas, indeed. (glossary, designer key, cast of characters) (Picture book. 8-10)"
Part character study, part encyclopedic indulgence in odd facts, this is one quirky French import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIND A FACE by François Robert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Stephen Johnson's Alphabet City (1995) to see their world through new eyes. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Striking a blow for animists everywhere, the authors find faces—wonderfully expressive ones, too—in such common household or industrial items as cheese-graters, clamps, a cookie-cutter, a chair, and a mop. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HECTOR AND THE SECRETS OF LOVE by François Lelord
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 2011

"Told in a wry, ironic, self-deprecating voice that sometimes addresses the reader, Lelord's second novel (Hector and the Search for Happiness, 2010) should intrigue readers of his first."
To analyze love is to find there is no there there. So it seems to Dr. Hector, a French psychiatrist wearied by the daily litanies of floundering romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OF FLIES, MICE, AND MEN by François Jacob
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1999

"If the likes of Jacob remain, there's hope."
A writer of style and substance narrates the transforming events of recent biology in seven inspired essays, neatly translated by Weiss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Interestingly, Jesus as an adult is always shown from behind or at a distance, making him a character that readers must interpret for themselves. (Nonfiction. 4-8)"
Newbery Medalist Paterson turns her talents and considerable experience as a religious educator to interpreting the life of Jesus in a style that children will understand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUHAMMAD ALI by Jonah Winter
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"As hagiography goes, it doesn't come any more unabashed than this—or more effective. (Picture book/biography. 4-10)"
Biblical syntax and cadences lift The Greatest from sports legend to prophet in this remarkable homage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIRD CHILD by Nan Forler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 11, 2009

"This is a sensitive account through an empowered youngster's eyes, significantly more abstract than Say Something, by Peggy Moss, illustrated by Lea Lyon (2004), but covering much the same emotional turf. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Eliza learns a powerful truth from her mother, which she draws on when a classmate is victimized. Read full book review >