Search Results: "Jeanette Keith"


BOOK REVIEW

KEITH by Stanley Booth
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 28, 1995

"Still, a welcome addition to the growing library of Stones- related tomes. (10 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A prose meditation on Rolling Stone Keith Richards by a man who entered the Stones' inner sanctum as a journalist in the late '60s and subsequently became the guitarist's friend and confidante. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEITH HARING by Kay Haring
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This sanitized treatment does a disservice to both subject and readers. (author's note, index of art works) (Picture book/biography. 4-8)"
Artist Keith Haring draws and draws, from childhood to adulthood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Keith does not exaggerate its historical significance but delivers an admirable account of a Southern city doing its best to deal with a frightening, incomprehensible epidemic."
The story of the devastation caused by the yellow fever epidemic in Memphis in 1878, which blighted the city for a generation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEITH RICHARDS by Victor Bockris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Interesting, and probably choice fare for Richards fans, but hardly gospel. (B&w photographs—not seen.)"
A gushing Keith Richards fanzine and high-bias Rolling Stones history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEITH RICHARDS by Christopher Sandford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2004

"Less than a glance at what drove 'the man death forgot.'"
Hollow if high-revved portrait of the Rolling Stones guitarist and songwriter from rock-music biographer Sandford (Mick Jagger, 1994, etc.). The only thing missing, tellingly, is his subject's voice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 11, 1991

"Limited, but nonetheless a valuable overview of an 80's phenomenon and his world. (Thirty-two b&w and 105 color photographs—not seen.)"
A largely sympathetic portrait of the recently deceased young artist whose works moved from the subway platforms of N.Y.C. to the walls of galleries and museums throughout the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEITH HARING: JOURNALS by Keith Haring
Released: July 1, 1996

"Fragmentary, not particularly enlightening, and lacking notes, these journals offer limited rewards even to the Haring aficionado. (illustrations, not seen) (Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
Recorded in sporadic bursts at various points in his brief career, these journals attest more to the late artist's amazing industry than to his analytical or descriptive powers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"For a contrast in depth and documentation, see Claire A. Nivola's recent Planting the Trees of Kenya: The Story of Wangari Maathai (2008). (author's note) (Picture book/biography. 4-7)"
Nobel Peace Prize-winner Wangari Maathai's work to reverse the deforestation of Kenya garners Winter's signature treatment: a spare, reverential text and stylized, reductionist paintings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANGELINA’S ISLAND by Jeanette Winter
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 4, 2007

Angelina misses Jamaica, and even though her mother says New York is home now, it certainly doesn't seem like it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BABY by Jeanette Winter
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 9, 2001

"Winter, as she did in My Name Is Georgia, uses a real artist's work as the basis for a visual feast. (Picture book. 3-6)"
There's a beautiful pattern and rhythm in the sound and sense of this story, whose images echo the music of its language. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TALE OF PALE MALE by Jeanette Winter
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2007

"Her style is iconic rather than realistic (the urban clouds in rosy heart shapes as the hawks soar together are but one example of their charm) but young readers will get it right away, and upon repeated, joyous readings. (author's note) (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)"
Winter's luminous, hieratic style, with its velvety rich color and carefully shaped geometry, is eminently suited for the now-famous story of Pale Male, the Red-tailed Hawk who lives in New York City. Read full book review >