Search Results: "Jeanne Quigley"


BOOK REVIEW

MURDER, BY GEORGE by Jeanne Quigley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 18, 2016

"As chatty and replete with hometown detail as Quigley's debut (All Things Murder, 2014). But gentle humor and an amiable lead make up for all those digressions."
A contested case of finders keepers turns deadly in upstate New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL THINGS MURDER by Jeanne Quigley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 21, 2014

"Quigley supplies more hugging, kissing and backbiting than actual suspense, especially since Veronica's detection skills partly rely on overhearing key conversations, but her genial debut ably captures small-town living and a sense of class and family."
In Quigley's debut, a former star of daytime drama solves a hometown mystery in the Adirondacks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARMED AND FEMALE by Paxton Quigley
Released: May 2, 1989

"While you are sitting comfortably watching television," advises Quigley, "get to know your weapon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 10, 2007

"First-rate research and journalism combine to tell a sad, often infuriating tale."
The descendant of Centralia, Penn., miners, former Miami Herald reporter Quigley reveals the moral complexities and political machinations surrounding the underground fires that virtually destroyed this small Pennsylvania town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 21, 1989

Diverse, experimental sampling of short stories by a talented new generation of Chinese writers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TMI by Sarah Quigley
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2009

"The novel's preachy tone will inspire some eye-rolling, as when Becca earnestly remarks that she's 'lucky to have such a caring stepdad,' and she seems suspiciously well-adjusted at the end, despite how things turn out for her—Pollyanna in MySpace. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Becca can't keep her mouth shut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"Quigley's narrative of Terrell and her court case is especially relevant in the wake of numerous well-publicized killings of black citizens by police officers and the latest wave of black activism."
A retelling of the events leading up to the landmark civil rights Supreme Court case District of Columbia v. John R. Thompson Co., Inc., which invalidated segregated restaurants in the city in 1953.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2004

"'The unending tragedy of Reconstruction is the utter inability of the American mind to grasp its real significance,' W.E.B. DuBois once remarked. Quigley's look at Reconstruction history in an unexpected quarter is a welcome addition to the scholarly literature."
Legal lynchings, anti-civil rights demonstrations, official indifference to acts of violence against African-Americans: welcome to New York, ca. 1865. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 8, 2011

"Blessedly responsible and sane, a worthy title for any career collection for teens and a must for aspiring models. (Nonfiction. 11 & up)"
The real skinny on modeling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PENDERWICKS ON GARDAM STREET by Jeanne Birdsall
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 22, 2008

"The rest of the story is a pleasant ramble of a read, replete with well-intentioned scheming, adolescent crushes, horrible homework disasters, soccer, secrets, school dances and lots and lots of literary allusion (and yes, a wedding). (Fiction. 8-12)"
This return to the Cameron, Mass., cul-de-sac home of the Penderwicks—romantic seventh-grader Rosalind, temperamental sixth-grader Skye, dramatic fifth-grader Jane, four-year-old Batty, and their widowed college-professor father, Martin, whom readers met in Birdsall's 2005 National Book Award-winning novel—begins with a visit from his sister, the girls' affable Aunt Claire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PEOPLE OF SPARKS by Jeanne DuPrau
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 25, 2004

"So you do a good thing, and that turns it around'), this fast-paced tale of post-Apocalyptic strife will resonate with new and returning fans alike. (Fiction. 9-13)"
At the end of The City of Ember (2003), Lina and Doon had found the way out of their doomed underground home. Read full book review >