Search Results: "Jeannie Schick-Jacobowitz"


BOOK REVIEW

JEANNIE OUT OF THE BOTTLE by Barbara Eden
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2011

"Irredeemably minor but inoffensive, like a half-remembered episode of a silly sitcom."
Eden comes clean. Squeaky clean. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF ROSY DOCK by Jeannie Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1995

"Baker's riveting collages dazzle the eyes and reward close examination; a note at the end reveals how the introduction of nonnative plants and animals into a landscape always has consequences, whether a pleasure or pox. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
An Australian desert, unchanged for thousands of years, undergoes a transformation that powerfully evokes the interrelationship of all things. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATERINA'S WISH by Jeannie Mobley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"Top-notch. (Historical fiction. 9-14)"
Thirteen-year-old Katerina and her little sisters want to believe in their dreams, but life in a Colorado coal camp threatens to turn them into pipe dreams. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I HAVE ANOTHER LANGUAGE by Eleanor Schick
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 1992

"The appealing soft gray of the illustrations is just right for this mood piece; with precise yet understated line and gentle shading, Schick depicts the narrator's joy and captures the special grace of a memorable performance. (Picture book. 5-10)"
In spare prose and soft-pencil illustrations, Schick (a former dancer who studied with Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey) evokes a day in the life of a young African-American performer, beginning with a glimpse of home and school but focusing on dance class and her first stage appearance, when ``every movement feels more real than it ever has before'' and when last night's dreams combine with the morning's first hint of spring to create ``Things I can't say in words,'' but can suddenly express with dance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIRROR by Jeannie Baker
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Perfectly spectacular. (Picture book. All ages)"
This entirely original book is a strong contender to bring to a desert island, especially as it's two books in one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HIDDEN FOREST by Jeannie Baker
FICTION
Released: March 31, 2000

"Not to be missed. (Picture book. 59)"
Vivid, inventive collages by author/artist Jeannie Baker make this picture book on the hidden underwater world of kelp forests a compelling addition to the ecology section of school and public libraries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLE by Jeannie Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 10, 2016

"A visually striking account of godwit migration—pair it with Sandra Markle's similar but more concrete The Long, Long Journey (2013), illustrated by Mia Posada. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Baker (Mirror, 2010, etc.) turns her eye to a story that parallels the migration of the godwit with a white, wheelchair-using child who wishes for flight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILD ABOUT BEARS by Jeannie Brett
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2014

"With its clear text and illustrations, this introduction is just the ticket for younger elementary readers. (map, glossary, bibliography, websites) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Both text and artwork support this book's title: full of facts, but only those emphasizing endearing bear habits; full of gentle watercolors that show peaceful bear-family scenes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOME by Jeannie Baker
Kirkus Star
by Jeannie Baker, illustrated by Jeannie Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

"Mesmerizing. (Picture book. 5-10)"
As she did in Window (1991), Baker offers an intriguing wordless observation of how a neighborhood changes over time through the vantage point of a double-paned window frame. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAVAJO ABC by Luci Tapahonso
ABC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Much care graces Tapahonso's debut, but it's bound to be misunderstood. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
``A DinÇ Alphabet Book'' is the subtitle of this attractive, confusing presentation of aspects of Navajo culture. Read full book review >