Search Results: "Jeff Leen"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 4, 2009

"Lean, harsh and lowdown, this bruising history leaves a mark."
The gripping history of a largely forgotten legend of wrestling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1989

An admirably thorough and keen investigative report by two Miami Herald reporters about the drag-lord demons of the Medellin (Colombia) Cartel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"A personal, heart-rending story of struggle and anguish in the face of unconditional love."
Following the untimely death of his adopted African-American son, a father seeks posthumous reconciliation in this affecting collection of personal letters by Gough. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN JEFF COMES HOME by Catherine Atkins
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Readers will not be able to view incidents of kidnapping and sexual abuse in the same way again. (Fiction. 13+)"
An accomplished, intense, and powerful first novel about what happens when a kidnapped boy is returned to his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOO SOON FOR JEFF by Marilyn Reynolds
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Another candidate for next year's BBYA list. (Fiction. 12+)"
Jeff, almost 18, and Christy, two years younger, have been going together for months. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAT BALD JEFF by Leslie Stella
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"More convincing as a stand-up comedy routine than a novel, but nonetheless a hilarious send-up of hippies and hipsters."
Newcomer Stella, founder of the Chicago 'zine Lumpen, creates a slacker hell and a disgruntled, wisecracking protagonist who rages successfully against the machine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEFF IN VENICE, DEATH IN VARANASI by Geoff Dyer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 14, 2009

"Unsatisfying as a novel, but the observations are piquant enough to make for an enjoyable read."
Part novel, part cultural travelogue, this latest from the British critic and novelist (The Ongoing Moment, 2005, etc.) consists of two sections, linked by the narrator's sensibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MANHATTAN HUNT CLUB by John Saul
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Readers unfamiliar with earlier versions may well be carried away, mainly by the immense research Saul has put into his tunnels and underground societies, less so by the strained melodrama."
Saul's new suspense brainchild rips off Richard Connell's much admired 1924 short story, "The Most Dangerous Game," a work so boredom-proof that this takeoff is no dangerous gambit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1998

"An informative and moving, albeit discomforting, read."
``My son has been ill for so long that he has . . . been touched by just about every fashion in contemporary mental treatments,'' says this informed, assertive father, who describes many of them in a personal chronicle of his psychotic son's painful life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO WANTS A HUG? by Jeff Mack
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Share widely. Few will be able to resist chuckling at this humorous yet heartwarming tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A big brown bear is generous with his hugs, and all the forest creatures appear to enjoy his embraces—except a grumpy, scheming skunk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DUCK IN THE FRIDGE by Jeff Mack
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"The silly scenario and pro-books-and-reading message accentuate the appeal. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A little boy asks, "Daddy, why do you always read me Mother Goose before bed?" The question prompts a zany tale from Daddy's boyhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AH HA! by Jeff Mack
by Jeff Mack, illustrated by Jeff Mack
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 20, 2013

"The ecologically sound and emotionally satisfying ending is sure to please all ages. (Picture book. 2-6)"
In Good News, Bad News (2012), Mack experimented with minimalism, creating text from the titular phrases alone; here, he challenges himself to dialogue created from just two letters of the alphabet, doubled and continually rearranged. Read full book review >