Search Results: "Jeffrey Ford"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BEYOND by Jeffrey Ford
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Heavy with ambiguity and symbolism, but the story itself never rises far above the mundane: a demonstration of what can happen when an initially splendid concept is pushed far beyond its natural design limits."
Final part of Ford's hitherto memorable fantasy trilogy (The Physiognomy, 1997; Memoranda, 1999) about ex-physiognomist Cley, his former Master, Drachton Below, and Below's adoptive son, the humanized demon Misrix, who now haunts the ruins of Below's Well-Built City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL IN THE GLASS by Jeffrey Ford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Ford (The Portrait of Mrs. Charbuque, 2002, etc.) romps engagingly here—his Schell an intriguing scoundrel, as if Sherlock Homes had a Moriarity taint in his gene pool."
1932—hard times for most; easy pickings for flim-flammers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PHYSIOGNOMY by Jeffrey Ford
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

Humorless, inflexible, drug-addicted physiognomist Cley is ordered by Drachton Below, Master of the Well-Built City, to investigate a theft in the remote mining town of Anamasobia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRACKPOT PALACE by Jeffrey Ford
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Ford finds his way into scenarios infernal, haunted or merely strange, and keeps his wits about him on the journey."
The fourth collection of stories from Ford includes examples of fantasy, science fiction, neo-steampunk, noir and a few genre-busting curiosities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PORTRAIT OF MRS. CHARBUQUE by Jeffrey Ford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2002

"Chillingly surreal with occasional lapses into downright silliness, but by and large Ford keeps the pages turning."
Fantasy author Ford (The Beyond, 2001, etc.) turns to a historical setting for this near-miss thriller set in little old New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHADOW YEAR by Jeffrey Ford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2008

"Properly creepy, but from time to time deliciously funny and heart-breakingly poignant, too. For those of you—and you know who you are—who think the indispensable element for good genre fiction is good writing, this is not to be missed."
From Edgar-winner Ford (for The Girl in the Glass, 2005), a tale about three kids, a small town and the banality of evil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NATURAL HISTORY OF HELL by Jeffrey Ford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"Violent, unsettling stories that nevertheless offer a great deal of humor, wit, and feeling."
A new collection by Ford (Crackpot Palace, 2012, etc.) offers 13 tales that revel in the dark and strange, exhibiting ardent and pliable storytelling that ranges from suburban exorcisms to ghosts in bucolic 1915 Ohio.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DROWNED LIFE by Jeffrey Ford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"Impressive eclecticism, enhanced by the pleasures of quietly quirky prose."
Sixteen stories ranging from the wildly surreal to the commonplace and poignant, from Ford (The Girl in the Glass, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BIRDIE by Jessie Ford
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"While the puzzle gimmick fails to soar, the book succeeds without it. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
A golden bird hides a sweet surprise beneath her wing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Obliquely told and unevenly illustrated, this Slinky story's just OK. (bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 5-8)"
Ford portrays the back story of the Slinky, the coiled steel toy that debuted in 1945 and still sells today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 24, 2017

"Quibbles aside, pastry chefs in the making will be fascinated by this accessible tribute to a true American icon and will be tempted to try the appended cookie recipe. (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
A chocolate candy bar cannonballing into a possessed mixer. Baking chocolate suddenly going AWOL. These are just a couple of the persistent myths orbiting the origins of America's quintessential dessert: the chocolate chip cookie. Read full book review >