Search Results: "Jeffry P. Lindsay"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 2000

"Hilary honors her father and celebrates her family legacy with this collection of fantastic hunting stories."
Hemingway and Lindsay (Dreamland, 1998) carry the Hemingway traditions of hunting, family, and storytelling into the new millennium. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TROPICAL DEPRESSION by Jeffry P. Lindsay
Released: July 29, 1994

"All the subtlety and complexity of a TV pilot with the middle third squeezed out."
The newest shingle out on Key West's crowded shamus row belongs to Billy Knight, a former cop who quit to become a charter fishing guide after a hostage standoff left his wife and daughter dead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMLAND by Hilary Hemingway
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Obviously a far cry from Papa Hemingway's realism, Dreamland is spotty SF that takes an occasional, if unintentional, satirical swipe at space-age angst. (Author tour)"
Anyone who still believes that visitors from outer space are little wrinkled green men with weaving antennae are in for some surprises in this novel by Hemingway (niece of Ernest) and her husband, Lindsay. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMCHILD by Hilary Hemingway
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 16, 1998

"Fun, but unlike tales by abduction specialist Budd Hopkins, less than convincing."
Borrowing a title from Dennis Potter, Hemingway (niece of Ernest) and her husband Lindsay continue a tale begun with Dreamland (1995), wherein Annie Katz seemingly lost her four-month foetus when it was abducted from her body by aliens but later returned so she could carry it to term. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2002

"An enjoyable peek behind the curtain for those with an interest in theater but little actual experience with its production. (20 b&w photos)"
The staging of Broadway's The Producers as seen through the confident and vivacious eyes of a chorus member who eventually got to understudy Matthew Broderick as well. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROCKY PATHS
by Ana Grilo

I walked into this book wholly unprepared for what I was going to find. It starts like a YA romance: with a seventeen old boy called Aspen eating out with his best friend Theo and his girlfriend Brandy. Aspen has been secretly in love with Brandy for a while, and he is hopeful that Theo and Brandy will break up ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Wert writes history the way it ought to be written: with clear prose, a deep understanding of his sources, and with the voices of ordinary men—all of which make the events as real to us as if they had only happened yesterday. (13 maps, not seen)"
A masterful and engaging account of the Civil War from the perspective of the soldiers who fought it, by the author of Custer (1996) and General James Longstreet (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"A worthy work that draws on previously unknown correspondence to give a lively, from-the-saddle view of life as a rebel horseman."
A sturdy life of the Confederacy's knight-errant, "the bold and dashing cavalier" who evoked chivalry in a theater of carnage and slaughter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUTH by Jeffry W. Johnston
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A crackerjack idea hobbled by weak characters and the author's heavy hand. (Thriller. 12-16)"
A teen hostage is forced to recount his battle with a home invader. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2005

"An engaging study, particularly for students of Civil War military history—and of leadership."
A carefully argued account of "the largest army in American history"—and one that barely survived its commanders. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A fair, though not uncritical, reappraisal of one of the Civil War's great but maligned soldiers. (Twelve maps, 16 pp. of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A carefully argued account of the general whom Robert E. Lee affectionately called ``my old war horse''—the same man who in the mythology of the Lost Cause became the scapegoat for the failure of Confederate arms at Gettysburg. Read full book review >