Search Results: "Jennifer Bradbury"


BOOK REVIEW

RIVER RUNS DEEP by Jennifer Bradbury
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 21, 2015

"A solid look at a fascinating historical side note. (Historical fiction. 8-14)"
A tubercular boy is sent to live in a cave that might heal him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHIFT by Jennifer Bradbury
FICTION
Released: May 20, 2008

"Fresh, absorbing, compelling. (Fiction. YA)"
A smart and moving coming-of-age story about two best friends, Chris and Win, who bicycle across the country the summer after high-school graduation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUTSIDE IN by Jennifer Bradbury
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 6, 2017

"A compassionate story of homelessness and friendship, recycled art and community. (glossary) (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
In Chandigarh, a town in northern India, is Nek Chand's Rock Garden, a magnificent, 40-acre garden of some 5,000 sculptures made from recycled ceramics, industrial waste, and discarded household scrap—and the real-life inspiration for this historical novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MOMENT COMES by Jennifer Bradbury
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 25, 2013

"Historical fiction that brings its history to bloody, poignant life: rare and notable. (glossary) (Historical fiction. 14 & up)"
India, 1947: As Britain prepares to divide the country before leaving, three lives unexpectedly intersect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WRAPPED by Jennifer Bradbury
FICTION
Released: May 24, 2011

"Austen fans who wish her characters would get up off their settees and risk an adventure will enjoy Bradbury's smart, feisty heroine (who is herself an avid reader of A Lady). (Mystery. 12 & up)"
An 1815 parlor diversion leads to a fizzy, frothy caper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1959

"The title is apt — the variety here is spice."
Science fiction and space give way here to the imaginative, fantastic and the inexplicable, in 22 stories that make up a swift kaleidoscope of patterns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TOYNBEE CONVECTOR by Ray Bradbury
Released: June 23, 1988

"Lyrical word-collage pasted around candy people: fantasy that just evaporates—and maybe best suited to a YA audience."
Bradbury's first story sheaf since The Stories of Ray Bradbury (1980) finds him more lyrically Bradburyesque than ever, in 22 new fantasies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRADBURY STORIES by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 2003

"His linked stories transporting Middle America to Mars in The Martian Chronicles (1950) gave him his biggest boost to fame, and though these shady-porch tales today may have a cheesecloth quality to their poetry, they remain his bubbling first masterpiece, with the present volume their bookend."
Ray Bradbury, now 83, selects 100 of his most celebrated tales from a lifetime in print twice the length of Poe's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAT’S PAJAMAS by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"Bradbury on autopilot, mostly, mixing dashes of beautiful whimsy with gold-tinged nostalgia and the occasional sharp stab of pain."
Forgotten or mislaid short fictions from a master who's given us better, but also much worse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAREWELL SUMMER by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 2006

"A thin work, heavily reliant on dialogue, but one that serves as an intriguing coda to one of Bradbury's classics."
Bradbury has yet another lesson to share about growing up and growing old. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDEN APPLES OF THE SUN by Ray Bradbury
Released: March 19, 1953

"A very pleasant variety show."
A double dozen from a recognized science-fiction writer, these stories range further in subject than his expected field, so that this is not necessarily confined to bug-eyed monster devotees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 28, 1973

"In either event, it might sell more copies than all this year's NBA nominees put together."
This sing-song collection of pretentious verse by the famous sci-fi author indicates once again, as if it needed proving, that most fiction writers have not the slightest aptitude for poetry. Read full book review >