Search Results: "Jennifer Close"


BOOK REVIEW

GIRLS IN WHITE DRESSES by Jennifer Close
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 16, 2011

"Wryly funny sketches of life in one's 20s."
Three young women and their friends navigate the tricky world of big-city adulthood after graduation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOPEFULS by Jennifer Close
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"This comedy about political insiders is surprisingly cheerless and weirdly apolitical."
From Close (The Smart One, 2013), a beach read for the election season about the friendship of two women whose husbands work in the Obama White House. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SMART ONE by Jennifer Close
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2013

"An unassuming but far from vacuous domestic comedy, perfect for the beach or a long plane trip."
Close, whose first novel (Girls in White Dresses, 2011) romped with recent college grads newly on their own, focuses here on two sisters on the cusp of 30, both torn between independent womanhood and lingering dependence on parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLOSE by Martina Cole
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2008

"A dismal sojourn in some very unpleasant company."
Irish crime family rules the rackets in 1970s London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLOSE by Bill James
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2017

"The often amusing, infallibly precious dialogue and self-reflexive asides will remind many readers of that other James, the one who wrote The Awkward Age, The Sacred Fount, and What Maisie Knew, without introducing a single homicide to trouble the waters."
The most willfully playful installment yet in James' increasingly playful saga of Harpur and Iles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Art lovers of all ages will revel in this vivid, wonderfully affecting book, which is almost as ingenious and memorable as Close himself. (timeline, glossary, list of resources and illustration credits) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A magnificent interactive "face book" portrait of the artist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNIFER GOVERNMENT by Max Barry
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"It's Catch-22 by way of The Matrix."
Bubblegum pop-future comedy in which corporations go to war like feudal fiefdoms. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNIFER, TOO by Juanita Havill
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1994

"The perky, realistic dialogue, lively b&w art, and assertive protagonist will all appeal to other young feminists, and to boys with older sibs, too. (Fiction. 7-10)"
The author of the popular Jamaica books offers three easy chapters about a cheerful child edging her way into her big brother's games with his friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNIFER, GWYNETH & ME by Rachel Bertsche
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2014

"A gratuitous work of celebrity worship."
One writer's attempt to "celebrify" her life by following the examples of today's leading ladies in pop culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT JENNIFER SAW by Hal Schweig
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 7, 2013

"A gripping tale of suspense, family dynamics and trauma's fallout."
Schweig's debut novel is a psychological murder mystery that traces the undoing of a family after tragedy strikes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNIFER MURDLEY'S TOAD by Bruce Coville
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Snagged immediately with ``If Jennifer Murdley hadn't been forced to wear her brother's underpants to school, the whole thing might never have happened,'' readers will find this latest escapade featuring Mr. S. H. Elives and his quirky magic-shop endlessly funny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO JENNIFER STEELE? by Jean Ruryk
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 8, 1996

"Cat's thin but entertaining second outing (Chicken Little Was Right, 1994, not reviewed) is full of heartwarming recoveries, dead-ended subplots, alarums and excursions—just not much mystery or detection."
Everybody hopes to find treasures among the trash in antique shops, but furniture restorer Catherine Wilde hits the jackpot at Canterbury House: a bag lady who turns out to be Jennifer Steele, onetime TV actress and childhood friend of Cat's late daughter Laurie. Read full book review >