Search Results: "Jennifer N Martin"


BOOK REVIEW

Psoriasis-A Love Story by Jennifer N Martin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 29, 2014

"A pleasant narrative of experiments in natural cures, alternative treatments and looking for a cure outside the mainstream."
The story of one woman's attempt to deal with her chronic skin condition. Read full book review >

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WHEN HISTORY IS BURIED ALONGSIDE THE BODIES
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham

Cover Story: Big Face Split Screen
BFF Charm: Yay
Swoonworthy Scale: 1
Talky Talk: She Said, He Said
Bonus Factors: Awesome Grownups
Relationship Status: So This Is Love

Cover Story: Big Face Split Screen

As a rule, I generally don’t like Big Face covers, and as with all rules, there are exceptions ...


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MY CHILDREN'S BOOK GHOST FILE
by Julie Danielson

Over at NPR last week, I heard a pop culture critic talk (here) about what he calls his Ghost File, or the books, television shows, and movies he didn’t review during the year. “[I]t's the great frustration,” he said, “that every year I'm haunted by all the terrific things I haven't talked about … ...


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FINDING BASQUIAT'S HUMANITY WITH JAVAKA STEPTOE
by Julie Danielson

The year 2016 has been a long and arduous one for many, so somehow it seems like an eternity ago to recall Spring, when I rounded up here at Kirkus some of Fall 2016’s best picture books, ones that I thought would make a splash when their time came. One of them was Radiant Child, Javaka Steptoe’s biography of the ...


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NONFICTION SPOTLIGHT
by Leila Roy

I’ve always been a fiction reader. While I’ve certainly read some nonfiction—mostly personal essays and memoirs, because of the narrative—when it comes to longform work, I’ve always been more drawn to fiction.

Serving on the Amelia Bloomer Project committee—helping to put together a list of the year’s best feminist books for readers 0-18—has forced me to broaden my reading horizons ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE BIG BIG SEA by Martin Waddell
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Clearly, memories are made of such stuff, but the touch is light; the spare text doesn't allow for ham-handedness. (Picture book. 3+)"
The indefatigable Waddell (Little Mo, 1993, etc.) shines with this tale of memory-making. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"Indisputably an important window into a little-discussed social abuse, fed here by gender and class volatility and contemporary blue-collar angst."
A disturbing, though overwrought, odyssey through same-sex harassment in the workplace, in this case the improbable, dangerous setting of an Alabama railroad yard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WHOLE STUPID WAY WE ARE by N. Griffin
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"Readers who invest in this quirky set of characters and circumstances will be rewarded. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
The friendship between optimistic Dinah Beach and depressed, nihilistic Skint Gilbert is tested in a carefully crafted and highly stylized tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Visionary by N. Dunham
Released: Nov. 25, 2012

"A middling teen-oriented fantasy story with adventure and romance."
In Dunham's debut YA fantasy, teenager Aislinn Murphy stumbles upon her psychic powers and can predict the future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Bubble Kids by N. Chowdhry
Released: July 1, 2014

"A well-balanced and often powerful story recommended for younger teens and history buffs."
A debut YA novel about life in Pakistan during and soon after the events of 9/11. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UH-OH, DODO! by Jennifer Sattler
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"A charming, cozy read-aloud with lots of visual interest. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A clueless little dodo stumbles into several adventures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FUNNY LITTLE BIRD by Jennifer Yerkes
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2013

"This highly original and thought-provoking picture book will appeal to the peek-a-boo sensibilities of the youngest readers and also have aesthetic appeal for parents. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The funny little white bird is almost invisible against his white background, unnoticed and, consequently, sad. Read full book review >