Search Results: "Jeremy Duns"


BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 2012

"The immediacy of Duns' writing grabs and suspends the reader in a beautifully realized heartbeat of recent history."
A trio of gritty spy yarns featuring British double agent Paul Dark. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREE AGENT by Jeremy Duns
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2009

"The plotting is delectably tricky, but the character of Dark requires more shading before he returns for the promised next episode."
Journalist Duns debuts with a thriller offering more spins than a Bolshoi gala, as an MI6 agent combs Nigeria for a lost love who can untangle a labyrinthine scheme devised during World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STUFF by Jeremy Strong
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2007

"In spite of the unfortunately silly title, here's a British import that boys may devour just as girls have loved Louise Rennison's Georgia Nicolson series. (Fiction. 12+)"
Fourteen-year-old Simon is a British boy working through a lot of problems: a new stepmother, a new stepsister, a school bully and a girlfriend named Delfine who's not as fine as a longed-for girl named Sky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HARM IN HATE SPEECH by Jeremy Waldron
NON-FICTION
Released: May 23, 2012

"A spirited defense without being heavy-handed."
A vigorously argued, intelligent challenge to the "liberal bravado" of U.S. First Amendment scholars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DAYS OF VIDEO by Jeremy Hawkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 2015

"A novel that manages to be both very funny and very sad, with an unrepentant belief in both movies and love served with a cleverness and irreverence that are difficult to resist."
In this funny, surprisingly tender debut novel, Hawkins tells the story of a misfit group of video-store employees whose efforts to save their beloved shop offer the reader a cast of lovable oddities and a streak of infectious adoration for the power of movies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 5, 2005

"Literary gossip, and catnip for book junkies."
A Canadian journalist who lived for a time at famed Parisian bookstore Shakespeare and Co. tells the story of its iconoclastic owner and his destitute but mostly merry band of boarders. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALT by Jeremy Page
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 2007

"Ultimately, Pip realizes that Goose has exerted the strongest influence in his life, a matriarch who 'battl[es] the clouds,' preserves family stories and never gives in to 'the temptation to give up.'"
A slowly paced debut novel in which the sights, smells and lore of the landscape of Norfolk, England, play at least as great a role as the characters who inhabit it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 5, 2002

"It may puzzle readers of Son of the Morning Star and fans of They Died with Their Boots On, but this is an intriguing addition to the Custer literature all the same."
An eccentric though highly readable blend of history, travelogue, and memoir that follows a wobbly trail behind George Armstrong Custer's globetrotting widow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEA OF DOUBT by Jeremy Holden
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2016

"A swift, unusually entertaining journey through present-day public relations."
Holden (Second that Emotion, 2012) offers a novel about a possible new Messiah—and a company that must sell the world on the concept. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 7, 1996

"Skip the ethical bombast and head straight for the prescriptive final chapter, where Iggers offers some practical, if not wholly original, solutions to our unhealthy obsessions with food and consumerism."
A culinary and cultural Luddite critiques the conspicuous consumption of modern American society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOY CAESAR by Jeremy Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 4, 2004

"What wants to be a transgressive thunderclap ends up a mildly diverting exercise."
Third-century emperor and twenty-first-century academic find they've got oh-so-much in common. Read full book review >