Search Results: "Jeremy Rifkin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1991

"Back to the Middle Ages with you, Rifkin, and see if you really like the common life."
It's been downhill all the way for 400 years, says Rifkin (co-author, The Green Lifestyle Guide, 1990, Entropy, 1980, etc.), in this latest jeremiad on modern times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 19, 1992

"Still, by putting all this readably together, he might well win a new and different audience."
Rifkin (Biosphere Politics, p. 460, etc.), who seems to turn out environmental calls to arms on an assembly line, now turns his guns on beef—in this survey of the cattle culture's destructive role in the modern world and in history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A bleak reckoning of the potential price of progress that will strike many observers as longer on ardor than analysis. (First printing of 50,000; author tour)"
A professional alarmist's attention-grabbing, albeit overstated, appraisal of a brave new world in which demand for labor could fall ruinously short of supply. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2014

"Intriguing but densely detailed and hyperbolic."
Rifkin (The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power Is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World, 2011, etc.) looks ahead to life after capitalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1998

"Readers willing to brave his messy exposition will find food for thought in Rifkin's book, but getting to it requires a lot of work. (First printing of 50,000; author tour)"
Scattershot doomsaying from a noted alarmist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIGNAL HILL by Alan Rifkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2003

"Exquisite."
Stories and a novella suggest that Rifkin is what might have happened had Nathanael West lived on and been even more talented. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STUFF by Jeremy Strong
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2007

"In spite of the unfortunately silly title, here's a British import that boys may devour just as girls have loved Louise Rennison's Georgia Nicolson series. (Fiction. 12+)"
Fourteen-year-old Simon is a British boy working through a lot of problems: a new stepmother, a new stepsister, a school bully and a girlfriend named Delfine who's not as fine as a longed-for girl named Sky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BATTLE FOR PARADISE by Jeremy Evans
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"An informative and well-documented story for readers interested in the intersection of business and ecology."
How a group of surfers and Central American villagers banded together to fight a multinational company and save an environmentally fragile stretch of Costa Rican shoreline. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 8, 2013

"Dauber's prose is swift, clean and clear, and the portrait that emerges is sharply focused."
In the latest entry in the publisher's Jewish Encounters series, Dauber (Yiddish Literature/Columbia Univ.; In the Demon's Bedroom: Yiddish Literature and the Early Modern, 2010, etc.) offers a brisk biography—and, at times, celebration—of the writer who created Tevye the Dairyman, the basis for what became Fiddler on the Roof. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HARM IN HATE SPEECH by Jeremy Waldron
NON-FICTION
Released: May 23, 2012

"A spirited defense without being heavy-handed."
A vigorously argued, intelligent challenge to the "liberal bravado" of U.S. First Amendment scholars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DAYS OF VIDEO by Jeremy Hawkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 2015

"A novel that manages to be both very funny and very sad, with an unrepentant belief in both movies and love served with a cleverness and irreverence that are difficult to resist."
In this funny, surprisingly tender debut novel, Hawkins tells the story of a misfit group of video-store employees whose efforts to save their beloved shop offer the reader a cast of lovable oddities and a streak of infectious adoration for the power of movies. Read full book review >