Search Results: "Jerome Groopman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The well and the sick alike will find much to ponder here— this is the kind of book whose thoughts and messages linger long after it has been closed. (First serial to the New Yorker; author tour)"
An astonishingly well written book that illuminates life's meaning without a trace of maudlin sentimentality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW DOCTORS THINK by Jerome Groopman
NON-FICTION
Released: March 19, 2007

"A highly pleasurable must-read."
A revealing, often disturbing look at what goes on in doctors' minds when treating patients, plus some advice to patients on how to work with their doctors to improve that process. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 20, 2004

"A thoughtful message, movingly yet unsentimentally presented by a physician alert to medicine's human as well as its scientific side."
Doctor/author Groopman (Second Opinions, 2000, etc.) insightfully examines the nature of hope and the role it plays in recovery from illness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2000

"Not profound literature, yet undeniably fascinating: Groopman has a good ear and a dramatic flair, and he delivers entertaining, often scandalous portraits of doctors at work."
A collection of eight case studies revolving around questions of diagnosis and treatment, by Harvard physician and New Yorker writer Groopman (The Measure of Our Days, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 20, 2011

"For readers who are not already proactive with their health care."
Bestselling author and oncologist Groopman (How Doctors Think, 2008, etc.) and eminent endocrinologist Hartzband collaborate to help readers rethink their health-care choices. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERYDAY MYSTERIES by Jerome Wexler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The exercise is mildly amusing but the whole enterprise never overcomes a sense of languid familiarity. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A book of full-color photographs by Wexler (Jack-in-the- Pulpit, 1993, etc.) divided into five different sections, each of which invites readers to take a different close-up view of everyday objects, from sweaters to potato chips. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUEEN ANNE'S LACE by Jerome Wexler
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"An excellent introduction to the rewards of botany as exemplified by learning about a particularly lovely species. (Nonfiction. 7-12)"
Like Wexler's Jack-in-the-Pulpit (1993), a lucid look at a familiar plant with intriguing characteristics and adaptations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BACK TO BATAAN by Jerome Charyn
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 1993

In a veteran author's weak first novel for young people—set in 1943 New York—a boy bounces between the palatial Upper West Side digs of a hated classmate and a hobo's makeshift shelter in Riverside Park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONTEZUMA'S MAN by Jerome Charyn
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Not for the fainthearted—each of Charyn's baroque anti- procedural fantasies is required reading for all the others—but another bracing immersion in the most sustained attempt to date to create a personal mythology out of a police hero."
Now that his right-hand-man Manfred Coen is dead, New York Police Commissioner Isaac Sidel (The Good Policeman, etc., etc.) recruits a new lieutenant, Joe Barbarossa, an Irish/Italian/Nez PercÇ on the outs with Isaac's Justice Department scourge Frederic LeComte ever since he killed Montezuma, a doper turned DEA undercover agent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI AND THE GAME THAT MUST BE LOST by Jerome McGann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2000

"The 'game' that McGann refers to is art, which can never fully fulfill its mission or be rendered perfectly in its execution. Nonetheless, if both Rossetti and McGann must eventually lose their game, their efforts are stronger than most."
McGann (Media/Univ. of Virginia) examines the poetry and paintings of Dante Gabriel Rossetti in an effort to determine why the artist's stature, so high between 1850 and 1910, fell dramatically with the rise of Modernism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Thought-provoking, if dry, historical fare for the intelligent nonexpert."
Blum (formerly History/Princeton; the scholarly The End of the World Order in Rural Europe, etc.—not reviewed) offers a detailed, if pedestrian, analysis of a remarkable decade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRICANE LADY by Jerome Charyn
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2001

"Even more disjointed than usual: a style that once seemed refreshing in its eccentricity now courts impatience like a one-trick pony turned just a little too frisky."
His famed Isaac Sidel saga (Citizen Sidel, 1999, etc.) on hold, Charyn explores the equally bizarro world of Jocko Robinson, the 97th richest man on earth. Read full book review >