Search Results: "Jessica Snyder Sachs"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Sachs discusses a variety of proposed solutions for infection as well as allergy, but basically the message is, 'Get over it! Learn to live and let live in a natural balance.'"
Chapter and verse on the bugs that outnumber, outwit and no doubt will outlast us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Sachs overdoes her attempts to broaden her subject's appeal by concocting silly monikers for her scientists, such as 'The New Mod Squad.' Otherwise, she brings humor and insight to a neglected but fascinating subject."
Sachs's first effort traces the long history of attempts to pinpoint time of death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST IMPRESSIONS by Marilyn Sachs
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2006

"But she also provides enough phone chat, mall shopping and family lore to make it all sweetly contemporary and much fun to read. (Fiction. 11-14)"
The middle child of five in a middle-class home, 15-year-old Alice is so involved in the plight of Mary, the middle sister in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, that she can't see the trajectory of the story and gets a C on her report. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TROUBLE WITH SANTA by Betsy Sachs
Released: Oct. 1, 1990

A "Stepping Stone Book" with chapters and enough pleasant, realistic b&w drawings to make the text approachable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST LIKE A FRIEND by Marilyn Sachs
Released: Oct. 1, 1989

"A believable problem novel by an experienced author; the exasperation evoked in the reader by Vi's spoiled-brat behavior is a fair indication of Sachs' skill."
Patti, 14, idolizes her mother, Vi, just 17 years older than Patti: a girlish, effervescent companion who loves to shop, provides a constant supply of homemade cookies, and is a favorite with Patti's friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOURTEEN by Marilyn Sachs
Released: April 1, 1983

"Bubbly and offbeat and, yes, more interesting than the likes of First Love."
Some funny, savvy stuff—especially about being the offspring/model of a children's book writer—hung on a forced, crypto-mystery plot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET OF THE NIGHTINGALE PALACE by Dana Sachs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 19, 2013

"A solid story."
Sachs (If You Lived Here, 2007, etc.) takes a conventional literary device—a road trip—and uses compassion, humor and good writing to transform the journey into a memorable story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DECEMBER TALE by Marilyn Sachs
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"What we're left with is the sobbing, though of course Sachs knows enough not to saturate the prose."
A heart-wringer about Myra, who is always crying—calls people on the phone, then just blubbers at them—and who has much to cry about. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NINTH by Harvey Sachs
NON-FICTION
Released: April 27, 2010

"A fan's notes—eloquent, erudite, passionate and musical."
The year 1824, viewed through the lens of Beethoven's final symphony—a mix of cultural history, memoir and musicology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY SISTER by Marilyn Sachs
Released: Jan. 1, 1986

"But it is in the humanity of these characters and their contradictions, as well as their values, that Sachs has made an ordinary story extraordinary."
The search for personal identity and romance are common themes of many YA novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SECRET FRIEND by Marilyn Sachs
Released: Oct. 20, 1979

"Salutary, perhaps, for the child similarly in thrall to a magnetic, exploitative personality—but Jess is too much of a doormat, and too little a person in her own right, to elicit the requisite sympathy from others."
Wendy is mean, no question about that, but she's fun too, and for five years Jessica has been enclosed in the circle of their friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEARS' HOUSE by Marilyn Sachs
Released: Oct. 15, 1971

"Despite the desolate environment it's a story of strength, for Fran Ellen's apparently meager resources prove sufficient to her needs and the potential stickiness of neglected waifs fixing their own Kool-Aid lunches is offset by restrained prose and the realistically shabby but affectionate drawings of Louis Glanzman."
When their father leaves home and their mother becomes too ill to function, Fran Ellen and her brother Fletcher attempt to keep the family together by hiding their plight from welfare investigators and teachers. Read full book review >