Search Results: "Ji-li Jiang"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 30, 1997

"It's a very painful, very personal- -therefore accessible—history. (Memoir. 11-15)"
A child's nightmare unfolds in Jiang's chronicle of the excesses of Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution in China in the late 1960s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED KITE, BLUE KITE by Ji-li Jiang
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 22, 2013

"Though this is told against the backdrop of a dark part of Chinese history, any child coping with separation from a loved one may find comfort in this story. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
Set during the Cultural Revolution in China, a heartwarming tale of a father and son whose love never stops soaring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOTUS AND FEATHER by Ji-li Jiang
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 13, 2016

"Gracefully told and illustrated, a gentle, positive encounter with a beautiful bird in an unfamiliar world. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The rescue of a crane restores an unhappy girl as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGICAL MONKEY KING by Ji-li Jiang
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2002

"Clever, arrogant, far longer on appetite than attention span, Monkey makes an engaging antihero whose acquaintance young readers, of any cultural background, with a taste for trickster tales will be glad to make. (Folktale. 8-10)"
With easygoing informality, memoirist Jiang (Red Scarf Girl, 1997) retells several adventures of this picaresque Asian folk hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COWSHED by Ji Xianlin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"An ancillary but meaningful document of a time too little chronicled and now all but forgotten by younger Chinese people."
Scarifying account of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESS LI / LA PRINCESA LI by Luis Amavisca
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 10, 2016

"While it is rare and refreshing to see a lesbian couple appear in a picture book outside the context of motherhood, the love affair between Li and Beatrice isn't likely to extend to their readers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This bilingual Spanish/English picture book celebrates an interracial love affair between two women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHY SNAILS HAVE SHELLS by Carolyn Han
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"An unusual, and unusually interesting, contribution, handsomely and intelligently produced. (Folklore. 6+)"
A very attractive collection of 17 animal fables and pourquoi tales, from a dozen of the 55 minorities that together comprise 7% (i.e., 67 million) of China's inhabitants, plus three from the majority Han (ethnic Chinese). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Mu-ji-Man Codes by Daniel L Adams
NON-FICTION
Released: July 8, 2013

"A novel theory diminished by the author's circumventing its blueprint."
Death is inevitable for all and disquieting for some. In this debut code book, Adams admits to being in the latter camp while exploring his evolution from obsessing over—as he calls it—Mr. Death to developing a system for predicting and maximizing life span. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MA JIANG AND THE ORANGE ANTS by Barbara Ann Porte
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"A fascinating story to read for the Chinese New Year, too, perhaps with a slice of orange for each young listener. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Porte and Cannon previously collaborated on Tale of a Tadpole (1997); this time their focus is on a different sort of tiny creature: orange ants, who play an important role in an original tale set in ancient China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOT, HOT ROTI FOR DADA-JI by F.  Zia
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2011

"A natural for reading aloud, laced with great tastes, infectious sound effects and happy feelings. (glossary) (Picture book. 5-8)"
Food, family and storytelling set irresistible hooks in this high-spirited double picture-book debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHU-LI AND THE MAGIC PEAR TREE  by Paul Yee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2017

"A lovely read in the Shu-Li series that provides diversity and celebrations of heritage for young readers. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Shu-Li and her classmates try to harness the magic of a neighbor's pear tree to save their school. Read full book review >