Search Results: "Jill Kastner"


BOOK REVIEW

BARNYARD BIG TOP by Jill Kastner
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Great fun. (Picture book. 4-7)"
It's just another day on the farm for Ben and his pig, Clarence, until Uncle Julius arrives with his Two-Ring Extravaganza. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MERRY CHRISTMAS, PRINCESS DINOSAUR! by Jill Kastner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Long live the princessaurus. (Picture book. 2-6)"

BOOK REVIEW

SNAKE HUNT by Jill Kastner
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"A deftly comic tale, with the girl and her granddad sharing their apprehension and relief. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Granddad's yarns of bear chasing and rattlesnake wrassling come back to haunt him when Grandma shoos him and Jesse out of the house, archly suggesting that they hunt up a snake for dinner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BUSY DAY by Jill Davis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"This warm, happy tale is just right to start or end a little one's day. (Picture book. 3-6)"
From dawn to dusk, a young child describes her eventful day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN NOVEMBER by Cynthia Rylant
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A quiet, pre-holiday gift. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A gentle hymn to an autumn month. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOWN AT ANGEL'S by Sharon Chmielarz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Kastner's gentle, earth-toned paintings, rendered in broad, light-filled strokes, reflect the narrative's pervasive sense of security. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Though other kids are put off by Angel's strange-looking eye (it's ``like a milky star'') and call him ``that dumb Bulgarian,'' the narrator and her little sister enjoy watching the old man make furniture, hearing operas on his radio, and eating the chocolate he gives them when they've helped their mama. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WANT TO GO HOME by Alice McLerran
ANIMALS
Released: May 22, 1992

"Large format makes this pleasant story particularly appropriate for groups. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Marta has been wanting a cat, but Sammy—whose old owners couldn't keep him—doesn't like their new home any better than she does: While Marta objects to the ugly wallpaper, Sammy hides and doesn't even come out to eat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Jill Bash by Maurice Jackson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 28, 2014

"Goth girl meets The Nutty Professor meets The Terminator."
Action and sci-fi go hand in hand as Jackson presents the high-octane adventures of a snarky teenage girl who sets out with her nerdy uncle to save the world from evil robots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STONE DANCERS by Nora Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

An imaginative but not wholly successful debut set in a remote mountainside village in 19th-century France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING JILL by Jill Kraft Thompson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2013

"A memoir that gives hope to those suffering from loss as well as guideposts on the road to recovery, as tenuous as it may be."
Kraft Thompson's debut memoir recounts the horrific deaths of the five people she loved most and her long road to recovery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2009

"Includes information on foundations that provide treatment for illness in companion animals. (Informational picture book. 6-10)"
In this true story some may find familiar from morning television, Jack begins as an abandoned puppy, newly adopted by his human mother Jill (an entertainment correspondent/animal-rights reporter) and ready to learn how to fit in and play with his canine siblings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAOMI KNOWS IT'S SPRINGTIME by Virginia L. Kroll
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 4, 1993

"Nice. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The prolific Kroll's litany of the signs of spring—with most of the lines that caption the double-spread illustrations beginning with the title—is lyrical (``...when the air stops nipping her nose and chin and kisses her cheeks instead...when her [tire] swing holds her in a safe, round hug and she sails and spins in a whirling twirl''), but it's just another evocation of the changing seasons—until, at the end, Naomi overhears a neighbor: ``If only Naomi could see the blue in the sky.'' For the first time, readers are clued into the fact that Naomi's blind. Read full book review >