Search Results: "Jim Harrison"


BOOK REVIEW

TRUE NORTH by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2004

"Bleak and uncompromising, but stout-hearted readers will be impressed by Harrison's fierce passion and dark poetry."
Brooding, occasionally brutal eighth novel, linked to the author's previous work (The Road Home, 1998, etc.) by blistering contempt for the diseased American polity and acute existential melancholy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROAD HOME by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A vivid meditation on the defining power of the family, and of the kind of redemption offered by an awareness of nature's rather pitiless beauty. (First printing of 75,000; $100,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
There is in all of Harrison's (Julip, 1994, etc.) work an almost pagan celebration of lives spent close to the land, and of the necessary round of life and death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIG SEVEN by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"After a lifetime of deep, dark fiction like Dalva (1988) and True North (2004), Harrison is entitled to relax with these autumnal ramblings."
Ex-cop Sunderson is as bemused as ever in Harrison's follow-up to The Great Leader (2011).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVER SWIMMER by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"Everyday epiphanies from a major author."
Though these two novellas feel slight in comparison with the best of the prolific author's novels, the ways in which they complement and contrast with each other attest to his range. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAST GOD FORGOT TO INVENT by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Typical Harrison: familiar, high-flown, and fleeting, with equal parts fine writing, weak plotting, compelling vision, comic antics, and locker-room anecdotes. The real point, from the man himself: 'The danger of civilization, of course, is that you will piss away your life on nonsense.'"
Another trio of novellas from Harrison (Julip, 1994, etc.) that, to varying degrees of success, revisits themes and characters from earlier work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A REALLY BIG LUNCH by Jim Harrison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 2017

"If this is the last we get from Harrison, it serves as a fitting memorial."
A celebration of eating well and drinking even better as a recipe for the good life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER HE DIDN’T DIE by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Harrison's admirers will find minor pleasures here, while waiting for the next novel."
Two novellas and an impressionistic memoir find Harrison in a relaxed mood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Delightful in small doses, but too intense to be consumed in a single sitting."
Novelist Harrison (The Beast God Forgot to Invent, 2000, etc.), a man of firm opinions and titanic appetites, here collects his previously published essays on food. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RETURNING TO EARTH by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 10, 2007

"Death remains a mystery, as Harrison explores the meaning it gives to life."
Meditations on mortality and quasi-incestuous desire inform this thoughtful, occasionally rambling novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ENGLISH MAJOR by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Lightweight, but the author's fans will find this an agreeable rest from the dark, deep fictions on which Harrison's reputation properly rests."
Rambling tale from Harrison (Returning to Earth, 2006, etc.) of a Michigan farmer, dumped by his wife after 38 years, who decides to visit all 48 states in the continental United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JULIP by Jim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 1994

"Like most people, Harrison's characters are caught right in the middle."
A hit and two misses by novelist, poet, and journalist Harrison (Dalva, 1988; Legends of the Fall, 1979). Read full book review >