Search Results: "Jo Lodge"


BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MR CROC! by Jo Lodge
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2015

"Some literal jaw-dropping at the climax gives this party-hearty pop-up a big finish. (Pop-up picture book. 1-3)"
Toddlers who find Lodge's Happy Birthday Moo Moo (2001) a touch tame will happily fasten on this toothier follow-up, a British import.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MOO MOO! by Jo Lodge
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2001

"Packed with plenty to look at and plenty to do, this is great entertainment for the small fry. (Picture book. 1-4)"
A happy heifer celebrates her special day in this novelty item that is short on words but big on fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARADISE LODGE by Nina Stibbe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"Another deft helping of absurd social comedy and unconventional wisdom from a writer of singular, decidedly English gifts."
An English teenager with a rackety home life finds part-time work in a local retirement home and encounters old people, eccentricity, gossip, and death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JO MALONE by Jo Malone
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A moving and revealing account of the author's passion for business and personal success."
Turning yourself into an upscale brand is extremely difficult. Fragrance guru and entrepreneur Malone chronicles how she did just that. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YO, JO! by Rachel Isadora
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2007

"The depiction of a little boy so thoroughly at home in his community is a delight to see in these suspicious days of stranger danger: Jo is indeed Peter's direct—and very welcome—descendant. (Picture book. 2-6)"
While big brother Franklin waits on the stoop for Grandpa to arrive home for dinner, Jomar engages every passer-by in an exuberant exchange of urban slang. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARSHAL OF MEDICINE LODGE by Stan Lynde
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2006

"Satisfying western fare, in the vein of Louis L'Amour."
A young U.S. Marshal sorts out a culture clash with bullets and brains in this wild, winning western. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JO-JO AND THE FIENDISH LOT by Andrew Auseon
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2009

"Lacking both the authentic relationships of Daniel Water's Generation Dead (2008) and the creative reinterpretation of Gabrielle Zevin's Elsewhere (2005), this novel just fades into the mist. (Horror. YA)"
Dead musicians guide a newly deceased teen in his search for his missing—and also "passed"—girlfriend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MO AND JO by Jay Lynch
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Lynch provides classic comic-book repartee in beginning-reader-friendly vocabulary ably matched to Haspiel's bold images and zippy colors; this high-quality production supplies good, old-fashioned fun and a superhero lesson that packs a wallop. (Graphic early reader. 6-9)"
The newest addition to the Toon Book early-reader series presents brother and sister Joey and Mona, who are always fighting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUCKY JO AND LITTLE HEART by Patricia Polacco
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Once again, this talented author/illustrator brings the past to life for young listeners and introduces them to unforgettable, admirable characters in the process. (Picture book. 7-10)"
Polacco shares the story of a World War II veteran who served in the Pacific as a very young man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VICTORY JO by Charles Moore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 16, 2016

"An engaging tale of a contemporary Navajo girl's connection to her horse and culture."
A blind Navajo teenager and her thoroughbred head to the Kentucky Derby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER AT MEDICINE LODGE by Mardi Oakley Medawar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 1999

"A dense, near-impenetrable forest of plots (large and small), a confusing parade of fussily described but unmemorable characters, and a suspense-less mystery—all make for the weakest of the author's work to date."
The year is 1867, and the Kiowahs, among other Indian tribes, are sending representatives to a meeting with US Government bigwigs and their soldier escort at Medicine Lodge, Oklahoma. Read full book review >