Search Results: "Joachim Neugroschel"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 21, 2002

"Several weeks' worth of good reading, and an invaluable gathering of the best of a remarkable literary tradition."
The ordeal of an embattled populace and the variety of a robust folk culture are preserved in this enormous anthology: an admirable labor of love executed with matchless skill by the veteran translator of Mann, Proust, Kafka, and many others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES OF MARCEL PROUST by Marcel Proust
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

"But readers who adore the mature Proust won't want to miss them."
All the fiction Proust (1871-1922) wrote, in addition to his autobiographical Jean Santeuil and his great seven-volume Remembrance of Things Past, is collected in this attractive volume, which contains the text of his first book, Pleasures and Days (1896), with a few semifictional journalistic sketches added, and six previously untranslated "early stories." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WITH DOWNCAST EYES by Tahar Ben Jelloun
Released: May 7, 1993

"Despite flights of fantasy that are too lush and too many: an affecting mood portrait of loss and the burden of memory."
From North African and Goncourt Prize-winner Ben Jelloun (The Sacred Night; Silent Day in Tangier): a lyrical, often allegorical evocation of exile—``that long and interminable night of solitude''—that's interrupted by brusque intrusions of reality that don't quite jibe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOACHIM: THE HERETIC by M.L. Stainer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 23, 2017

"An excellent, comprehensive read for any serious student of the Elizabethan Age and anyone concerned with intolerance."
This sequel to Stainer's Joachim's Magic has Joachim Gans back in Elizabethan England, where he is accused of heresy while his apprentice, Reis Courtney, works his way toward manhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPEER by Joachim Fest
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Of great interest to students of the Nazi regime and of the inexhaustible human capacity for evil."
A thoughtful reassessment of Albert Speer's role in the Third Reich. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 22, 1996

"A story of pathos and defeat rather than heroism and triumph, it may unwittingly reinforce our view of the aggregate unwillingness or inability of Germans to resist Hitler's vision."
Sure to fuel the continuing controversy over the response of German citizens to National Socialism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"He may be right that the possible anti-Semitism of Nietzsche's Wagner phase hasn—t really been dealt with—maybe, even, that Nietzsche was a homosexual—but Kîhler's own exploration of these questions is itself insufficient. (14 illustrations)"
A speculative, sometimes fanciful interpretation of the relationship between Friedrich Nietzsche and Richard Wagner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Like the curate's egg, good in parts."
An East German psychotherapist explores, in an occasionally affecting way, the experience of living within a totalitarian system. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT I by Joachim Fest
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"A beautifully written and translated work that creates rare, subtle portraits of Germans."
A stunning portrait of a strenuously anti-Nazi family in Berlin who managed to hang on to their moral convictions during the brutalizing Hitler years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2004

"A well-considered slice of the Nazi era, and one with a happy ending."
A vivid reconstruction of the final weeks of Hitler's regime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KING by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"Spare and dreamlike, yet for all its delicacy harshly real: a story that opens a window on a world easily ignored, and makes its case long after the last page is turned."
As usual from Berger (Isabelle, 1998, etc.), a deceptively simple tale—here, about a day in the life of a homeless couple and their German Shepard, on whom they rely—turns into a thing of eloquence and beauty, with tragedy and humanity evident in equal measure. Read full book review >