Search Results: "Joan Aiken"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2007

"A short but compelling work in praise of its subject."
Veteran biographer Spoto (Enchantment: The Life of Audrey Hepburn, 2006, etc.) takes a fresh look at the much-analyzed Joan of Arc. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An engrossing religious and historical account that would make a valuable companion to a high school history unit on Joan of Arc."
Debut YA that fictionalizes the life of Joan of Arc. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YOUNGEST MISS WARD by Joan Aiken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Fun yet slight fodder for Mansfield Park fans."
Aiken's latest Austen-inspired work (Emma Watson, 1996, etc.) takes up the fate of the youngest Ward daughter from Mansfield Park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IS UNDERGROUND by Joan Aiken
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1993

"Dark, compelling, and thoughtful—with hints of another sequel. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The irrepressibly inventive Aiken returns to the Dickensian alternate Britain of Dido and Pa (1986) with a heroic adventure starring Dido's sister, Is. Ravening wolves pursue Is's uncle to her cottage; before expiring, he begs her to find his missing son. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIDLE THE WIND by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 28, 1983

"Murky demonism, inadequate action, wordy narration: only for readers with an uncritical addiction to period adventures."
In the plodding Go Saddle the Sea (1977), 13-year-old orphan Felix (half Spanish, half English) picaresqued his way from Spain to 1820s England in search of long-lost relatives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL FROM PARIS by Joan Aiken
Released: June 1, 1982

"Nonetheless, her no-nonsense tone and offbeat panache move the fragmented episodes along quite spiffily—and the many Aiken fans will find this a lively smorgasbord of un-frilly period entanglements, with some quasi-feminist resonances."
The girl from Paris is Ellen Paget, who starts out in 1860 as the girl from Brussels: though English-born, 21-year-old Ellen has spent the past few years as a student and then a teacher at the exclusive Pensionnat girls' school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STREET by Joan Aiken
Released: May 22, 1978

"How the pair wins out and saves the village is unfolded, in brisk lines and ten spoofy-silly musical comedy songs, with more style than you'll find in most plays made for juvenile production; still, kids who go to the trouble of performing the play might wish to be rewarded with more substance."
Once there were magical bulls running through but now there are only trucks speeding down the center of the one-street village called Street, and most of the residents have been crippled in traffic accidents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CASTLE BAREBANE by Joan Aiken
Released: May 24, 1976

"The plot and the parlance thicken to a 'silly flisk-mahoy' but it's surely much better than all those others you'd like to whisht away."
Joan Aiken is no doubt the busiest body in the gothic revival, with stories of outrageously cheerful improbability. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SKIN SPINNERS by Joan Aiken
Released: March 22, 1976

"Aiken can be entertaining in small doses, but this overlong collection only exposes the forced and shallow impulses behind the verbal acrobatics."
Those who already know "Fable" ("Pity the girl with the crystal hair") from Cricket will have some idea of the sort of perky conceits Joan Aiken works up into rhyme and meter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOICES IN AN EMPTY HOUSE by Joan Aiken
Released: March 28, 1975

"It's incessant but Miss Aiken doesn't really insult your intelligence since she's impounded it from the beginning and you find yourself reading it all too easily so why won't others."
This, the most modern of Joan Aiken's entertainments, utilizes all her spendthrift energies so that it's the more the better, or rather the more the worse, and hellbent all the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SILENCE OF HERONDALE by Joan Aiken
Released: July 3, 1964

"Although much of this is reminiscent, the handling is lively, even saucy."
Deborah, penniless in England, is hired by a Mrs. Morne to teach her prodigy-play writing thirteen-year-old niece, Careen, who promptly runs away to Herondale, in Yorkshire, to an uncle, dead before her arrival there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


Aiken fans will be disappointed in this weak collection, though it does include some interesting ideas: ghosts who look like live people except for their eyes, which are holes through their heads; a priest and his intellectual brother, who play an elaborate board game of Pilgrim's Progress; pollution and urban wreckage that are used as elements of horror; and characters in modern settings who inherit an ancestral ability to write poetry. Read full book review >