Search Results: "Joan Aiken"


BOOK REVIEW

A CLUSTER OF SEPARATE SPARKS by Joan Aiken
Released: March 3, 1972

"It's touches such as this, along with the poison gas in the organ, which redeem the essentials (murder; an old love affair; a child who has been kidnapped and may have the remarkable mnemonic gifts of his father which make him wanted by the Chinese — no less) and give it a saving grace for those who read Joan Aiken and Mary Stewart."
Joan Aiken out of period disguise resembles Joan Aiken and Mary Stewart (this takes place on a Greek island where the heroine is accused of reading her) and the story is such an overwhelming overstatement that it's best to focus on the scenery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 20, 1994

"An engaging, calamity-filled romance rich with Aiken's shrewd reading of Austen's people and an appreciative sense of fun."
Prolific, innovative storyteller Aiken (Jane Fairfax, 1991, etc.) again pays tribute to Jane Austen in a cheerful spinoff of Sense and Sensibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHTBIRDS ON NANTUCKET by Joan Aiken
Released: Aug. 5, 1966

"Like whale blubber, the storyline is a mess to boil down, but it's got as much robust energy as one of the happier sea chanties."
It's a whale of a lot of fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANE FAIRFAX by Joan Aiken
Released: May 21, 1991

As in her Mansfield Revisited (1985), Aiken (author of over 50 novels, plays, etc.) revisits Jane Austen's lanes and chambers to produce a pleasant, eminently respectable complement to Emma, a novel some Janites consider Austen's Hamlet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIDLE THE WIND by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 28, 1983

"Murky demonism, inadequate action, wordy narration: only for readers with an uncritical addiction to period adventures."
In the plodding Go Saddle the Sea (1977), 13-year-old orphan Felix (half Spanish, half English) picaresqued his way from Spain to 1820s England in search of long-lost relatives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YOUNGEST MISS WARD by Joan Aiken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Fun yet slight fodder for Mansfield Park fans."
Aiken's latest Austen-inspired work (Emma Watson, 1996, etc.) takes up the fate of the youngest Ward daughter from Mansfield Park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WHISPER IN THE NIGHT by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 26, 1984

"For the most part, however, these are crisp, unfussy mini-chillers—tidily plotted, reasonably varied, nicely balanced between creepiness and warm sentiment."
Thirteen eerie yet oddly cheery stories from the ever-reliable Aiken—mostly set in Cornwall (her favorite locale), mostly contemporary, and mostly ghostly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MOONCUSSER'S DAUGHTER by Joan Aiken
Released: Jan. 21, 1974

"This might well be such stuff as grand performances are made on."
This rich, spoofy, pseudo-sinister farce is what Joan Aiken must have been practicing for with Winterthing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MONKEY'S WEDDING AND OTHER STORIES by Joan Aiken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2011

"Stylistically, these stories are very much from another era (two of them were originally published under the pseudonym Nicholas Dee), but the moral insights in them are timeless."
Darkly whimsical stories, most of them from the 1950s and six of them previously unpublished, by the late author best known for the fanciful Wolves of Willoughby Chase series and Jane Austen sequels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PEOPLE IN THE CASTLE by Joan Aiken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 12, 2016

"Sprightly but brooding, with well-defined plots, twists, and punch lines, these stories deserve a place on the shelf with the fantasies of Saki (H.H. Munro), Sylvia Townsend Warner, and Susanna Clarke."
A welcome anthology of fantasy stories by a 20th-century master. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 22, 1969

"Each of the others has an equally catchy idea but the tempos are uneven and none is consistently fluent."
These eight brief stories feature some unconventional situations but their potential goes unrealized. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1962

"329, J-153)."
Bleak roads, marauding wolves and an isolated mansion combine to form an atmosphere of haunting suspense on the first few pages. Read full book review >