Search Results: "Joan Aiken"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 9, 1977

"Nothing spectacular, but a few notables and all (fifteen) with the distinct imprint of that practiced hand."
The signature is unmistakable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STOLEN LAKE by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 12, 1982

"As Dido would have it, 'There's one as'l bear watching.'"
Dido Twite's back in a larky adventure story that boasts a free and spirited adaptation of Arthurian legend and a generous supply of menace and chills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TEETH OF THE GALE by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Although this is a rousing good adventure as is, there are frequent references to past adventures; it will be enjoyed most by readers familiar with them."
Felix de Cabezeda y Brooke—who escaped Napoleonic Spain to search for his noble family in England (Go Saddle the Sea) and returned to Spain at 13, only to be shipwrecked and pursued through the Pyrenees by a possessed abbot (Bridle the Wind)—is summoned from his studies at Salamanca by his old friend Juana to help rescue her cousin's children, held prisoner by their political-rebel father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1985

"Aiken aficionados are sure to love and treasure this collection; indeed, the author may find herself with a bumper crop of new fans as well."
An impressive collection of stories by the award-winning author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTERTHING by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 1, 1972

"However lulling her message might be for our time, it's a disappointment that this pastmistress of melodramatic novels has come up with so undramatic a play."
The curtain opens to the moving-in bustle and grumbling of four children and the old "Auntie" who has raised them and whom they are now protecting from being "sent away" as a consequence of her klepto- and pyromaniacal excursions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMBROIDERED SUNSET by Joan Aiken
Released: Sept. 25, 1970

"With so much going on, it has lots going for it along with humor and some genuine surprises."
This is a plummy diversion pursued with providential abandon and discarding all the predictables of the genre (Miss Aiken calls it a "light romance") including the happy ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KINGDOM AND THE CAVE by Joan Aiken
Released: March 8, 1974

"Whether one takes Astalon at face value or reads for the witty asides that are buried here and there (the evil governess Miss Simkin came well recommended by the Le Fays) this is an enjoyable if not ground-breaking expedition."
If Joan Aiken chooses to indulge in a Hobbity/Prydainy pastiche one might; expect her to have something more than imitation in mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CLUSTER OF SEPARATE SPARKS by Joan Aiken
Released: March 3, 1972

"It's touches such as this, along with the poison gas in the organ, which redeem the essentials (murder; an old love affair; a child who has been kidnapped and may have the remarkable mnemonic gifts of his father which make him wanted by the Chinese — no less) and give it a saving grace for those who read Joan Aiken and Mary Stewart."
Joan Aiken out of period disguise resembles Joan Aiken and Mary Stewart (this takes place on a Greek island where the heroine is accused of reading her) and the story is such an overwhelming overstatement that it's best to focus on the scenery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIDO AND PA by Joan Aiken
Released: Sept. 12, 1986

"Readers who get past these barriers will find lively characters and an enthralling story."
In another sequel to The Wolves Of Willoughby Chase, Aiken creates a London "100 years ago," when good Scottish King Dick sits on the throne while Bonnie Prince Georgie, Hanoverian, plots usurpation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 18, 1974

"This thick volume combines stories from three English collections by Aiken (A Harp of Fishbones, A Small Pinch of Weather, All and More), and though its fey frailties are not our favorite Aiken mood, her fans might make a contact here and there."
These twenty-one lit'rary fairy tales were "written during a span of nearly twenty-five years" and are indeed not what you'd expect — being more precious by half than Joan Aiken's usual fare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1987

"A special treat for Mortimer's (and Aiken's) fans."
Mortimer, the raven, and his unflagging, sensible sidekick, Arabel, are back with four more hilarious, very British sequences of mishaps. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1962

"329, J-153)."
Bleak roads, marauding wolves and an isolated mansion combine to form an atmosphere of haunting suspense on the first few pages. Read full book review >