Search Results: "Joan Aiken"


BOOK REVIEW

SMOKE FROM CROMWELL'S TIME by Joan Aiken
Released: Aug. 7, 1970

"Many of the incidents are zany and imaginative, others are almost silly, and although the supply of eccentrics is substantial, the resolutions to the stories are often disappointing."
Like Joan Aiken's last, less mature collection, A Necklace of Raindrops (1969, p. 631, J-253), these stories have some intriguing elements but they tend to lose focus or stop short at the end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STOLEN LAKE by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 12, 1982

"As Dido would have it, 'There's one as'l bear watching.'"
Dido Twite's back in a larky adventure story that boasts a free and spirited adaptation of Arthurian legend and a generous supply of menace and chills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREEN FLASH by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 28, 1971

"These are the best — there's an occasional sketchier one -but all in all it's wide open-eyed, open-ended entertainment for everyone who wants to spend an evening on the edge of that Hitchcock chair."
The subtitle "and other tales of horror, suspense, and fantasy" indicates the range but not the extraspecial competence of Miss Aiken's collection. . . whether it's the gently disquieting, deathdirected attrition of "Mrs. Considine" or the disconsolate "A View of the Heath" in which a little old lady rents an attic room as a repository for the romantic loss and sheer clutter of her lifetime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTERTHING by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 1, 1972

"However lulling her message might be for our time, it's a disappointment that this pastmistress of melodramatic novels has come up with so undramatic a play."
The curtain opens to the moving-in bustle and grumbling of four children and the old "Auntie" who has raised them and whom they are now protecting from being "sent away" as a consequence of her klepto- and pyromaniacal excursions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KINGDOM AND THE CAVE by Joan Aiken
Released: March 8, 1974

"Whether one takes Astalon at face value or reads for the witty asides that are buried here and there (the evil governess Miss Simkin came well recommended by the Le Fays) this is an enjoyable if not ground-breaking expedition."
If Joan Aiken chooses to indulge in a Hobbity/Prydainy pastiche one might; expect her to have something more than imitation in mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST MOVEMENT by Joan Aiken
Released: June 10, 1977

"A passing fancy too smooth to pass up."
To heavenly Helikon—a cross between Tanglewood and Jack LaLanne in the Greek isles—come aspiring stage designer "Mike" Meiklejohn, with her recuperating mum, and celebrity-playwright Lady Julia, with her brand-new, sunstroked second husband. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 18, 1974

"This thick volume combines stories from three English collections by Aiken (A Harp of Fishbones, A Small Pinch of Weather, All and More), and though its fey frailties are not our favorite Aiken mood, her fans might make a contact here and there."
These twenty-one lit'rary fairy tales were "written during a span of nearly twenty-five years" and are indeed not what you'd expect — being more precious by half than Joan Aiken's usual fare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANE FAIRFAX by Joan Aiken
Released: May 21, 1991

As in her Mansfield Revisited (1985), Aiken (author of over 50 novels, plays, etc.) revisits Jane Austen's lanes and chambers to produce a pleasant, eminently respectable complement to Emma, a novel some Janites consider Austen's Hamlet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SMILE OF THE STRANGER by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 20, 1978

"Except, of course, evil old Mum."
Another topnotch confection from a first-class pastry cook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 20, 1994

"An engaging, calamity-filled romance rich with Aiken's shrewd reading of Austen's people and an appreciative sense of fun."
Prolific, innovative storyteller Aiken (Jane Fairfax, 1991, etc.) again pays tribute to Jane Austen in a cheerful spinoff of Sense and Sensibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIDNIGHT IS A PLACE by Joan Aiken
Released: April 22, 1974

"But it works beautifully on more than one level, and Midnight Court earns its place in the landscape of humorous fiction."
Dickens would enjoy this book, and so will Aiken fans who have been waiting for a full-scale 19th century novel ever since The Wolves of Willoughby Chase and its successors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL FROM PARIS by Joan Aiken
Released: June 1, 1982

"Nonetheless, her no-nonsense tone and offbeat panache move the fragmented episodes along quite spiffily—and the many Aiken fans will find this a lively smorgasbord of un-frilly period entanglements, with some quasi-feminist resonances."
The girl from Paris is Ellen Paget, who starts out in 1860 as the girl from Brussels: though English-born, 21-year-old Ellen has spent the past few years as a student and then a teacher at the exclusive Pensionnat girls' school. Read full book review >