Search Results: "Joan Z. Calder"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 28, 2011

"A vibrant, enriching tale that kids will love."
Calder and Quiel present an engaging, educational and beautifully illustrated story about two monarch butterflies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMPEROR LAYS AN EGG by Brenda Z. Guiberson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Although The Emperor's Egg, by Martin Jenkins (1999), covers similar territory, school and public libraries will find this title useful for elementary school science reports, and nature lovers will love the pictures. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)"
Pity the poor papa penguin as he perseveres in protecting his precious progeny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAD THINGS by Richard Calder
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Obsessive, murky, horrid; the only thing missing is the government health warning."
Third in Calder's sometimes fascinating but, latterly, disgusting trilogy about the robot-vampire plague of Meta; strange to say, the publishers quote Kirkus's remark ``a thoroughly unpleasant piece of business'' (on Dead Boys, p. 30) with approval. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WELCOME TO THE BED AND BISCUIT by Joan Carris
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Kids will welcome sequels. (Fiction. 6-10)"
Grampa aka Dr. Adam Bender owns and runs the Bed and Biscuit, an animal boarding house. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"A scholar's accessible and measured appraisal of a prospectively hot spot that sooner or later could bring itself to the American public's attention in a host of unwelcome ways. (charts; maps, not seen)"
An impressive overview of the varied challenges East Asia poses to an Atlantic-oriented America's strategic interests in the aftermath of the Cold War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN A FAMILY WAY by James Calder
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2005

"Calder's ambitious third gets slack and repetitive in places but marks a big step forward in depth, laying a nice foundation for future installments."
A Frisco filmmaker again turns detective, this time to solve the murder of his young niece. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2004

"If the National Enquirer is where reporters go to die, it must be America's most exciting retirement community."
The notorious tabloid's former editor explains in this zippy memoir how it changed the face of journalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 18, 2002

"Readable and near-comprehensive. Those inclined to anticapitalist views may take issue with Muller's assurances that things seem to go better with free markets, but his far-reaching survey provides grist for many mills."
A thoughtful study of European responses, pro and con, to the steady ascent of capital, and of an intellectual preoccupation with the capitalist economy that has endured for centuries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALLED BY A PANTHER by Michael Z. Lewin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 17, 1991

"Despite an oddly inconclusive ending, a good time is had by all, especially smart-talking, dumb-acting Samson and his readers."
Albert Samson, Indianapolis's most likably raffish private eye (Out of Season, etc.), returns after a too-long sabbatical to take on two cases: tailing socialite Charlotte Vivien for her possessive, marital-minded protÇgÇ, tame poet Quentin Quayle (who begins by asking Samson to vet his story about his fictional wife being murdered—a device to clear the way for the nuptials), and—more important— locating a bomb stolen from the Scum Front, a gang of toothless environmental terrorists, before its new owners depart from Scum Front protocol by blowing it up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 29, 2012

"Despite its conventionality, young fantasy fans will likely enjoy this novel and take away lessons about different cultures."
A 10-year-old boy from another planet time-travels around Earth as he tries to track down his missing parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HADES by Mark Z. Danielewski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"For fans only. From this installment, it's hard to see how Danielewski will keep up the narrative energy to bring the story to a close 20 volumes from now—but readers deep into the series will be wanting more all the same."
"Envy is not a vewy laudable twait." No, Elmer Fudd hasn't gone to work for Mossad, but he wouldn't be out of place in this sprawling-by-formula continuation of Danielewski's (Honeysuckle and Pain, 2016, etc.) modern epic. Read full book review >