Search Results: "Joanna Briscoe"


BOOK REVIEW

YOU by Joanna Briscoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Although implausible and suffocating, this rapture of obsession and lyrical landscape is not unimpressive."
Infatuation and secrecy maintained over decades drive—very slowly—an intense three-generational saga of women's longings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON THE BUS WITH JOANNA COLE by Joanna Cole
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 20, 1996

"A book as appealing as any Cole has written, good for recreational readers and report-writers alike. (Autobiography. 10-13)"
A grand autobiography in the Creative Sparks series that is both accessible and entertaining. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY by Connie Briscoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 24, 1996

"Briscoe's been touted as another McMillan or even a peer of Morrison's, but the stilted dialogue, heavy-handed moralizing, and plodding plot here keep her in a lesser league entirely. (150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Briscoe returns (Sisters and Lovers, 1994) to tackle 30 years of African-American history through the wide eyes of an Everywoman protagonist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

P.G. COUNTY by Connie Briscoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 17, 2002

"Designer names and hackneyed plot can't liven up this tawdry, uninspired soaper from the author of Big Girls Don't Cry (1996), etc."
Schemers and sluts in Prince George County. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LONG WAY FROM HOME by Connie Briscoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Heartfelt, but a thin and unsatisfying take on a weighty and still urgent subject. (First printing of 150,000, $350,000 ad/promo, author tour)"
In a disappointing third novel, the bestselling author of Big Girls Don—t Cry (1996), etc., draws on her family's history in a story about slavery, miscegenation, and the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SISTERS AND LOVERS by Connie Briscoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1994

"Smoothly readable, but flat and uninventive. (First printing of 35,000; Literary Guild alternate selection; $50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Imagine Terry McMillan's Waiting to Exhale without the sex, the sizzle, and the funky humor and you have a fair idea of Briscoe's first novel about three black sisters and their problems with their menfolk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMOS JELLYBEAN GETS IT RIGHT by Joanna Walsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

Amos Jellybean knows he's bright (his mum says so), but he still always seems to scramble the many instructions he's given: "So I . . . take my bed downstairs, put it on the table, sit down on my breakfast and eat my clothes." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DID YOU EVER SEE? by Joanna Walsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Science books for the young can and should do better than this. (Picture book. 3-5)"
This new offering from the Tate Gallery's publishing arm asks simple questions about visual perception, challenging readers to make judgments about relationships between familiar objects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAR BEAR by Joanna Harrison
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 5, 1994

"Katie might just as well have had this correspondence with her parrot. (Fiction/Picture book. 4-8)"
Katie and the bear who lives under the stairs at her house start a correspondence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAKE-BELIEVE TALES by Joanna Troughton
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"An entertaining story that effectively represents the wisdom of the culture from which it comes. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A frequent contributor to the useful ``Folk Tales of the World'' series retells a ``Law Tale'' concerning four animals who bet a rich traveler that they can tell a story the traveler won't believe, thereby providing a frame for a series of amusing tall tales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRIZZLY DAD by Joanna Harrison
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"In a season full of saccharine, this is the real thing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Dad wakes up one morning, he is in a GRRRRIZZLY mood, and after grrroaning, grrrizzling and GRRRUMPing, he goes back to bed where he can't do any more damage. Read full book review >