Search Results: "Joanna C. Galdone"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 1970

"No one will want to abandon Leslie Brooke but like Galdone's Henny Penny, this animates the tale for the widest possible audience."
Three little pigs to savor, and a wolf to lord it over: from the clover-sprigged jacket (three-leaf of course) to the third little pig covering the steaming pot from which the wolf's tail protrudes, this is a blithe, unbloody business with a leer on the face of the wolf that you can only laugh at. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 29, 1971

"The fox's wary glances, self-satisfied grin and disdainful posturing provide all the comment a child will need on the straightforward narration of the text."
This picture-book version of three of Aesop's better-known fables includes the fox's pursuit and rejection of the "sour grapes," his comeuppance at the hands of the stork over the shape of their soup dishes, and his flattery of the crow into singing and dropping the coveted cheese from her mouth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TURTLE AND THE MONKEY by Joanna C. Galdone
Released: March 21, 1983

"Even Galdone's drawings lack spirit, with repetitive, minimally varied shots of Monkey and Turtle facing off against a slapdash tropical background."
Described as "a Philippine tale," this story of a turtle who finds a banana tree in the river and a monkey who cheats her out of its fruit begins with a catchy folklore situation but ultimately trails off in bits and pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUSS IN BOOTS by Paul Galdone
Released: April 9, 1976

"A Puss for the people."
Like Stobbs last year, Galdone trims Puss's tale for younger listeners and sacrifices also the dash and splendor of Marcia Brown's illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRST SEVEN DAYS by Paul Galdone
Released: March 15, 1962

"The basic question of visually interpreting mankind's oldest story for children on so grand a scale and through one's private imagery can never even arise since this particular effort is so evidently unappealing."
An artist who has achieved superb effects in comic and human interest themes and considerable originality in depicting light verse for children has gone far afield in attempting to illustrate the story of creation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENNY PENNY by Paul Galdone
illustrated by Paul Galdone
Released: Oct. 1, 1968

"Artful artlessness, that catches the tempo and amusement of an old favorite, that doesn't smother it With special effects."
Led by the misled Henny Penny, five mettlesome fowl march across sunny pages, follow sideling Foxy Loxy into his cave and disappear forever in deep green gloom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 26, 1969

"Presumably why it alone endured."
Jack Sprat could eat no fat,/ His wife could eat no lean,/ And so between them both,/ They licked the platter clean has always had a ring of finality but the blurb claims—and Mr. Galdone evidently believes— that children inquire "And then what happened?" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 8, 1969

"And some of it is worth seeing."
The Jataka tale of the monkey who twice outwits the predatory crocodile, first by pretending that he keeps his tastiest part, his heart, in a tree, then by persuading him to be a talking rock (and so reveal his whereabouts), is amusing enough but no better as a picture book until you reach his last laugh: feigning a jump into the crocodile's wide-open mouth — and knowing that the crocodile will have to close his eyes — he pounces on the crocodile's head, springs across to the fiver bank and gets home free to his tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM, TOM THE PIPER'S SON by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 10, 1964

"The well drawn, energetic illustrations increase the captivating quality of the rhymes—which will charm those who hear and see Tom's rambling journey through the English countryside and on to France."
Paul Galdone is once again at his exuberant, unrestrained best (as he was in A Capital Ship, 1963) caricaturing Tom and the diverse people and animals the piper's son encountered. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE SILLIES by Paul Galdone
Released: Sept. 1, 1981

"In this mock-Victorian interpretation, the conclusion comes off particularly well—'So the young man went home and married his own dear silly'—and the two hearts set below, one grinning, one demure, reinforce the feeling that what we have is not so much a dimwit tale as a valentine."
A genial rendering of the classic Joseph Jacobs' tale—with less suggestion of witlessness and less pictorial ingenuity, perhaps, than the Margot Zemach version (now o.p.), but probably more popular appeal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDROCLES AND THE LION by Paul Galdone
Released: April 28, 1970

"And with more compassion, less mockery."
A serio-comic treatment of the fable in situ—i.e. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MONSTER AND THE TAILOR by Paul Galdone
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"But for the single child, listening or looking, it's a crudely executed artifice."
In intent, another "Scary Story"—following The Tailypo and King of the Cats; in actuality, a lame excuse for a story framing a central scare sequence. Read full book review >