Search Results: "Joanna C. Galdone"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 1970

"No one will want to abandon Leslie Brooke but like Galdone's Henny Penny, this animates the tale for the widest possible audience."
Three little pigs to savor, and a wolf to lord it over: from the clover-sprigged jacket (three-leaf of course) to the third little pig covering the steaming pot from which the wolf's tail protrudes, this is a blithe, unbloody business with a leer on the face of the wolf that you can only laugh at. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TURTLE AND THE MONKEY by Joanna C. Galdone
Released: March 21, 1983

"Even Galdone's drawings lack spirit, with repetitive, minimally varied shots of Monkey and Turtle facing off against a slapdash tropical background."
Described as "a Philippine tale," this story of a turtle who finds a banana tree in the river and a monkey who cheats her out of its fruit begins with a catchy folklore situation but ultimately trails off in bits and pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 29, 1971

"The fox's wary glances, self-satisfied grin and disdainful posturing provide all the comment a child will need on the straightforward narration of the text."
This picture-book version of three of Aesop's better-known fables includes the fox's pursuit and rejection of the "sour grapes," his comeuppance at the hands of the stork over the shape of their soup dishes, and his flattery of the crow into singing and dropping the coveted cheese from her mouth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUSS IN BOOTS by Paul Galdone
Released: April 9, 1976

"A Puss for the people."
Like Stobbs last year, Galdone trims Puss's tale for younger listeners and sacrifices also the dash and splendor of Marcia Brown's illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRST SEVEN DAYS by Paul Galdone
Released: March 15, 1962

"The basic question of visually interpreting mankind's oldest story for children on so grand a scale and through one's private imagery can never even arise since this particular effort is so evidently unappealing."
An artist who has achieved superb effects in comic and human interest themes and considerable originality in depicting light verse for children has gone far afield in attempting to illustrate the story of creation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PADDY THE PENGUIN by Paul Galdone
Released: Aug. 17, 1959

"Paul Galdone whose animal stories and drawings have won him a considerable reputation catches the humor of the penguin without sacrificing accuracy in his treatment of the aquatic bird."
A very wistful penguin looks longingly at the Arctic sky, wishing that — since he has wings, he could fly like a proper bird. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGIC PORRIDGE POT by Paul Galdone
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"Ah well, some like it obvious."
The story of the magic porridge pot gone out of control is an old favorite (and one of ours) and Galdone gives it an amusing twist by having the mother forget the magic words (frantically shouting "halt!" and "cease!" instead of "stop!" as the porridge flows down the village streets) and the little girl come to the rescue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 19, 1982

"But there's nothing fresh about any of it, just a competent professional performance."
Galdone borrows from folklore for this little tale of Fox and the progressively lip-smacking contents of his sack. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUMPELSTILTSKIN by Paul Galdone
Released: March 18, 1985

"Certainly these pictures will project to storyhour crowds, but they are all blare and no echo."
A Galdone-illustrated folktale can be counted on for visual thrust and expression, but in recent years those Galdone trademarks have become perfunctory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GINGERBREAD BOY by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 1, 1975

"We must admit that his ogling threshers and mowers have less individual appeal than the typically Galdone-y loping cow, stuffed looking horse and ever-so-self-satisfied fox, but children will follow along breathlessly with every one of them right up to that last snip snap snip when the Gingerbread Boy goes ''the way of every single gingerbread boy that ever came out of an oven."
Galdone has already proven many times over that he is perfectly at home with those traditional nursery tales that are still preschoolers' favorites, and his expressive, unassuming style just right for their very young audience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MONSTER AND THE TAILOR by Paul Galdone
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"But for the single child, listening or looking, it's a crudely executed artifice."
In intent, another "Scary Story"—following The Tailypo and King of the Cats; in actuality, a lame excuse for a story framing a central scare sequence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 8, 1963

"If you don't like what Saxe did with the original — welcome to the club."
The illustrator has set his pictures against the John Godfrey Saxe version of the famous Indian legend. Read full book review >