Search Results: "Joanna Challis"


BOOK REVIEW

MURDER ON THE CLIFFS by Joanna Challis
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"Du Maurier becomes the latest luminary to suffer the indignity of being named sleuth by an author in search of a gimmick. Challis (Eye of the Serpent, 2007, etc.) provides ample hints of Rebecca, but no hint of its author's mastery of atmosphere or suspense."
Seeking inspiration to begin her writing career, young Daphne du Maurier visits Cornwall and finds a dead bride-to-be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERIL AT SOMNER HOUSE by Joanna Challis
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 9, 2010

"The anemic mystery indicates that this installment is best approached as a romantic look at the young Daphne before she became a famous author."
A second adventure for Daphne du Maurier and her sister Angela. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE  VILLA OF DEATH by Joanna Challis
Released: Dec. 6, 2011

"Challis' underwhelming mysteries, loosely based on the novelist's life, put Daphne du Maurier in situations that will later turn up in her novels. In this case, think Manderley."
Obsession with an ancient manor house may be the motive for murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TURNING FOR HOME by Sarah Challis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 19, 2003

"Hardly a Booker contender, but an enjoyable bedtime read."
Second novel, first US publication from Britisher Challis: a surprisingly affecting tale about an old lady's (and an old horse's) last chance for the grand life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAKE-BELIEVE TALES by Joanna Troughton
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"An entertaining story that effectively represents the wisdom of the culture from which it comes. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A frequent contributor to the useful ``Folk Tales of the World'' series retells a ``Law Tale'' concerning four animals who bet a rich traveler that they can tell a story the traveler won't believe, thereby providing a frame for a series of amusing tall tales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRIZZLY DAD by Joanna Harrison
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"In a season full of saccharine, this is the real thing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Dad wakes up one morning, he is in a GRRRRIZZLY mood, and after grrroaning, grrrizzling and GRRRUMPing, he goes back to bed where he can't do any more damage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RULES OF SUMMER by Joanna Philbin
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 4, 2013

"Philbin hits all the buttons designed to attract chick-lit readers—major wealth, casually mentioned fashion, hot boyfriends and, of course, universal beauty—for a summertime diversion. (Chick lit. 12 & up)"
When a middle-class girl spends the summer living with a superrich family on Long Island, conflict and romance result. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HE GOES, SHE GOES by Joanna Torrey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Perhaps appealing to certain hip, stricken readers, but not to the many."
The author of Hungry (stories: 1998) offers a listless first novel, an intimate, often claustrophobic-feeling fictional memoir about the death of a father, the lives of two edgy sisters, and their happily liberated dancing mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUNGRY by Joanna Torrey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"Bright lights, bad city, okay book. (Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selection; author tour)"
A feisty debut collection of six stories and a novella featuring feminist urban guerrillas, mostly stymied, who take their pleasure in ``Raisin Rage'' lipstick, etc. Torrey's women all desperately want more control over their lives and their hungers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 2013

"An engaging story of one woman's cancer fight."
A funny, honest memoir of breast cancer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 13, 2011

"Historians and philosophers may be engaged, but this is much too weighty for casual readers."
A scholarly look at more than two centuries of varying interpretations of what it means to be human. Read full book review >