Search Results: "Joe Cepeda"


BOOK REVIEW

UP by Joe Cepeda
by Joe Cepeda, illustrated by Joe Cepeda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"An accessible and imaginative title for emergent readers just learning to decode and understand the written word. (Early reader. 3-7)"
One gusty fall morning, a surprise blows through an open window into the bedroom of two sleeping children, both with dark hair and light-brown skin. It's a pinwheel! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SWING by Joe Cepeda
by Joe Cepeda, illustrated by Joe Cepeda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Engaging fantasy with bright watercolor illustrations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Josey finds a virtual treasure trove, in a very unusual way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE by Larry Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"It's lean, mean, and original."
With this, his fourth book in as many years, Brown delivers on the huge promise of his first, the tough-as-nails collection of stories, Facing the Music. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE by Ron Padgett
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Written with profound admiration and affection, but the author should have hit Delete more frequently. (38 b&w and color photos and illustrations)"
A fond chronicle of the nearly 40-year friendship between poet Padgett (Great Balls of Fire, not reviewed) and artist Brainard, who died of AIDS-related pneumonia in 1994. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GET READY FOR GABÍ by Marisa Montes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"A glossary of Spanish terms is included. (Fiction. 6-9)"
A third-grader of Puerto Rican descent, Gabi (the accent comes later) speaks Spanish at home and English at school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAT'S MEOW by Gary Soto
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"The Spanish dialogue in the main text appears in translation in footnotes. (b&w illustrations, not seen, glossary) (Fiction. 7-10)"
Mexican-American third-grader Graciela has more reason than most to complain that her parents don't understand her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE JOE by Mary Serfozo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

``Bang''; ``bong''; ``hop''; ``stop'': each word appears twice, in large type and also creatively integrated into a sequence of illustrations depicting a small boy exploring his yard and neighborhood, making noise by dragging a stick along a picket fence and by banging on garbage pails, then considering a stop sign, splashing and squishing through puddles, and finally bringing his muddy footprints home—where Mom greets his dawning awareness of the tracks he's just made with rueful indulgence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIRL, A BOY, AND THREE ROBBERS by Gail Gauthier
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2008

"Cepeda's infrequent angular grey-scale drawings add interest to this text-heavy chapter book. (Fiction. 7-9)"
On the three afternoons a week Brandon spends at Hannah's house, he claims he would rather watch TV than play Hannah's imaginative games, but he can't resist the real adventures when neighbor children decide they want to keep Hannah's horrible cat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEARCHING FOR OLIVER K. WOODMAN by Darcy Pattison
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"As with its predecessor, understatement and ambiguity are everything; Oliver's fans will happily embrace both. (Picture book. 5-8)"
That intrepid hitchhiking doll is back—and gone, as his repeat trek from South Carolina to California goes terribly awry, and Tameka enlists the help of Paige Hall, an investigative reporter, to track him down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRY YOUR BEST by Robert McKissack
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"The Green Light Readers format also includes discussion questions, a simple activity suggestion, author and illustrator bios, and two additional pages of information on the series. (Easy reader. 5-7)"
Putting forth your best effort is the theme of this intermediate easy reader set during an elementary-school sports day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAPPY HAIR by Carolivia Herron
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"She's clearly a child who stomps through life with a lot of spunk and energy. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Uncle Mordecai calls out the story of Brenda's hair—the nappiest hair in the world—at the family picnic, while everyone else chimes in with affirmations: ``Yep,'' ``You said it,'' and ``Ain't it the truth.'' At first they think Mordecai is making fun of Brenda's hair; when he says that combing it out sounds like crunching through deep snow with two inches of crust on top, somebody says, ``Brother, you ought to be ashamed.'' But soon it's clear that his only purpose is celebration: ``One nap of her hair is the only perfect circle in nature,'' hair that is ordained by God Himself. Read full book review >