Search Results: "Joe L. Blevins"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Historical fantasy that doesn't quite come to life."
Winston, a poor but literate young man, tries his hand at starting a family in New England in the 1630s, but he's cursed by witches and forced to be their slave. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE by Larry Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"It's lean, mean, and original."
With this, his fourth book in as many years, Brown delivers on the huge promise of his first, the tough-as-nails collection of stories, Facing the Music. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE by Ron Padgett
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Written with profound admiration and affection, but the author should have hit Delete more frequently. (38 b&w and color photos and illustrations)"
A fond chronicle of the nearly 40-year friendship between poet Padgett (Great Balls of Fire, not reviewed) and artist Brainard, who died of AIDS-related pneumonia in 1994. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE JOE by Mary Serfozo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

``Bang''; ``bong''; ``hop''; ``stop'': each word appears twice, in large type and also creatively integrated into a sequence of illustrations depicting a small boy exploring his yard and neighborhood, making noise by dragging a stick along a picket fence and by banging on garbage pails, then considering a stop sign, splashing and squishing through puddles, and finally bringing his muddy footprints home—where Mom greets his dawning awareness of the tracks he's just made with rueful indulgence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An election-year must-read."
Becker's novel, republished from 1995, imagines an alternate political reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT THE L? by Kate Clinton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2005

"Veers wildly among topics, but covers recent political history and gay rights issues with rapid-fire, sometimes blessedly cathartic humor."
Lesbian comic Clinton (Don't Get Me Started, 1998, etc.) riffs on everything from SpongeBob SquarePants to the Supreme Court in this ultra-wry collection of columns and short essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

'L' IS FOR LAWLESS by Sue Grafton
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 4, 1995

"Minor work for Kinsey ('K'' is for Killer, 1994, etc.), who appears in just about every role imaginablecheerleader, traffic cop, accessory after the fact to the felonious hunters of Johnny Lee's treasure. She's everything, in fact, except a detective."
Just a few days before she's to be a bridesmaid at her ancient landlord Henry Pitts's Thanksgiving wedding, Kinsey Millhone agrees to help her late neighbor John Lee's family recover enough money from the Veteran's Administration to pay for his burial, and it's all downhill from there for Kinsey's bridesmaid's plans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 21, 1992

"A well-timed clarion call that ultimately mirrors its own picture of the philosophy it celebrates—messy, vital, infuriating, and invigorating."
A spirited defense of American liberalism that proves every bit as engaging and cantankerous (and wordy) as its subtitle. Read full book review >