Search Results: "Joel Slemrod"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2000

"A fair-minded exposition of a politically loaded subject."
Economists Slemrod (Univ. of Michigan) and Bakija (Williams Coll.) provide a sometimes dense but mostly easy-to-read road map of the US tax system. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEXTER BEXLEY AND THE BIG BLUE BEASTIE by Joel Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2007

"Fanciful fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When a little boy encounters a fantastical creature, he uses his imagination to keep his new friend entertained. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEORGE BALANCHINE'S THE NUTCRACKER by Joel Meyerowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"An attractive book that will be most useful as a complement to the film. (Nonfiction. 5-12)"
In the manner of Violette Verdy's step-by-step retellings (Of Swans, Sugarplums, and Satin Slippers, 1991), a scrupulously detailed narration explicating what's seen in a full performance of The Nutcracker—in this case, the new film version. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEXTER BEXLEY AND THE BIG BLUE BEASTIE ON THE ROAD by Joel Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2010

"Readers will be perfectly happy just to be on the ride. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Dexter Bexley and the Big Blue Beastie are at it again in this entertaining sequel to their eponymous debut (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADDIS BERNER BEAR FORGETS by Joel Stewart
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 6, 2008

"Written in spare rhythmic language, the text lends itself to being read aloud; however, a close inspection of the illustrations is absolutely necessary for full understanding and enjoyment of this subtle, lovely tale. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Addis Berner Bear, a brown bear, arrives in a large, nameless city amidst the chaos of swirling snow, speeding cars and rushing holiday shoppers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2011

"Like a growing number of critics, Brinkley argues that raising a nation from poverty requires an effective government, democratically elected or not. Otherwise, aid is money down the toilet."
An excellent though dispiriting account of a country whose historic poverty, exacerbated by the Vietnam War, remains remarkably unchanged. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"This is one of those rare books that elevates the usual bureaucratic drudgery of corporate America to an almost Shakespearean level of characterization, passion, and drama. (Author tour)"
What Tracy Kidder did for computers, Brinkley now does for television, in this masterful chronicle of the flips, foibles, and frenzy that characterized the nearly decade-long race to develop high definition television (HDTV). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW CENSORSHIP by Joel Simon
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"Not so much a powerful reading experience as an attempt to influence international policy."
As the executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, Columbia Journalism Review and Slate contributor Simon (Endangered Mexico: An Environment on the Edge, 1997) has a worthy agenda, which he advances here in a manner devoid of both sensationalism and much literary flair.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"A grim reminder of the many 'reasons why species should be preserved.'"
A shocking account of how the passenger pigeon, a bird found only in North America, became extinct. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"On the other hand, the author knows American business and businesspeople thoroughly, making this an important management tool for a cleaner era."
Massive information-gathering and a dedicated belief in the potential profitability of green business practices distinguish this lively manual for the environmental reform of companies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2003

"Brief bursts of bloodthirsty action interspersed with reminiscences, aristocratic circumlocutions, meditations on life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and how for serving girls getting raped is best regarded as part of the job description. Fans only."
Third in the series in which a band of Earthlings guide a late-medieval world where magic works toward—if not democracy, at least an end to slavery and oppression. Read full book review >