Search Results: "John Barth"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"A dilettante par excellence, Barth has read intelligently and indiscriminately enough to have something interesting to say at almost any time."
Like The Friday Book (1984), a collection of eclectic and irregularly insightful essays by the noted novelist—an admixture of reminiscence, manifesto, and review. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOT-WEED FACTOR by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 19, 1960

"However, the literary models Mr. Barth has chosen give him ample scope for pornography and scatology and all the archaism will not disguise the elements and incidents of disgust and distaste which were certainly prominent in his earlier modern allegory, The End of the Road."
Ebenezer Cooke, an innocent like Candide, was born in Maryland but raised in 17th century England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF TEN NIGHTS AND A NIGHT by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 2004

"Best for those who consider Barth an essential contemporary writer—whose numbers may be, well, 'contracting.'"
The storytelling urge, in old age and under duress, as seen in the veteran postmodernist's latest collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 18, 1984

"Primarily for those involved in the philosophy-of-fiction quarrels, then, along with passionate fans of Barth's novels and stories."
Lectures, introductions, symposium contributions, and other miscellaneous pieces (written on Friday mornings)—most of which end up as arguments for Barth's "postmodernist" approach to fiction, with extensive references to his own work (especially the numbing LETTERS). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOST IN THE FUNHOUSE by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 1968

No American writer under forty is as lavishly admired as John Barth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMING SOON!!! by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 20, 2001

"'Whether the reader finds entertaining or tiresome such smoke-and-mirror tricks, a staple of Postmodernism, will depend on that reader's taste and experience.' The reader couldn't have said it better himself."
Are we ready for this? Another labyrinthine metafiction from the veteran literary gamesman who has beguiled and befuddled readers with such brainteasing doorstoppers as Giles Goat-Boy (1966), Letters (1979), and The Tidewater Tales (1987). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONCE UPON A TIME by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 4, 1994

"Very vintage Barth, and disappointingly so, despite the occasional reminders of a talent once new and stunningly inventive."
In a reprise of old themes, haunts, and ideas, metafiction master Barth (The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor, 1991) returns to himself and his native Chesapeake Bay in this fictional memoir of a middle-aged writer embarked on an autumnal cruise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILES GOAT-BOY by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 1966

"His major conceit, finally, is the assumption that the reader will tolerate almost anything for an intolerable length of time merely because it is awfully philosophical and terribly clever."
Mr. Barth's grandiose novel is constructed as an elaborate Conceit: the World is a University. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLLECTED STORIES by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"As part of Barth's challenging postmodernist corpus, the short stories offer smaller doses of the odd pleasures and strains of a restless intelligence and its relentless gaming of the literary system."
A monumental assemblage of this antic author's short fiction, most of it steeped in the literary history and postmodernist contortions of "that peculiarly American species, the writer in the university." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLOATING OPERA by John Barth
Released: Aug. 24, 1956

"The scene is the Eastern shore of Maryland, and The Floating Opera is a showboat which docks up there."
A deliberately digressive and, on occasion, smugly salacious report on the life and times of Todd Andrews, a bachelor, a lawyer, and a philosopher of (and out of) sorts who reviews his life as it was influenced by a heart condition and prostate trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LETTERS by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 8, 1979

"For most everyone else—a sorry spectacle, baroque and listless, noisy and busy and smug and empty."
Straight from the ivory tower—here's the ultimate, unreadable academic novel, and, sadly, the fiercest ammunition imaginable for John Gardner's self-righteous "moral fiction" crusade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST VOYAGE OF SOMEBODY THE SAILOR by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 1990

"A thin story in a very fat book."
Barth is back with another big (544-page), bawdy, and "postmodernist" book, replete with the usual metafictional conceits, in which the "New Journalist" hero, a contemporary Scheherazade of sorts, likes to swap tales with the legendary Sinbad the Sailor, while trying to get his bearings, both metaphorically and literally. Read full book review >