Search Results: "John Berger"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 20, 1985

"The occasional pleasures to be found in The Sense of Sight cannot, however, outweigh the tedium and air of self-congratulation to be found on almost every page."
Someone, at some time, must have told Berger he was sensitive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KING by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"Spare and dreamlike, yet for all its delicacy harshly real: a story that opens a window on a world easily ignored, and makes its case long after the last page is turned."
As usual from Berger (Isabelle, 1998, etc.), a deceptively simple tale—here, about a day in the life of a homeless couple and their German Shepard, on whom they rely—turns into a thing of eloquence and beauty, with tragedy and humanity evident in equal measure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 30, 1984

"Near-homilies—less stimulating, or irritating, than usual."
Modest, uncontentious reflections on things personal and epochal—time and timelessness, love, home—by the noted Marxist critic of art and society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROM A TO X by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 25, 2008

"Berger's writing comes off as equal parts somber and exalted."
A novel comprised of a series of letters allegedly "recuperated" by Berger (Hold Everything Dear, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE IS WHERE WE MEET by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2005

"Berger also treats us to reflections on Borges (buried in Geneva), Rembrandt's Polish Rider, the Cro-Magnon and nights of innocent, unconsummated passion with a fellow art student as the bombs fell over wartime London. His endless curiosity restores the spirits."
Discrete scenes from a mellow, largely autobiographical journey through time and space. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIG EARTH by John Berger
Released: Sept. 1, 1980

"Peas and porridge, but no pie."
In the darkness, which precedes sight or place or name, man and calf waited." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOWARD REALITY by John Berger
Released: Jan. 1, 1962

"To anyone else, a rather genteel and gullible propagandist."
Londoner John Berger is the art critic of the New Statemans and The Observer; he's also a Marxist, as anyone reading "Toward Reality" will not fail to notice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEEPING A RENDEZVOUS by John Berger
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A too-mixed bag, unbalanced mostly by political deadweight."
Berger (The Sense of Sight, 1985, etc.) as art critic is a maddening case. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 2007

"Why is the publication date timed for the sixth anniversary of 9/11? For the maximization of profits, of course."
Slender, slight collection of aphoristic essays by British art critic, novelist and political activist Berger (Here is Where We Meet, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOOK OF THINGS by John Berger
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"Diversely rewarding."
Berger is a Marxist critic who so far eludes sectarian expectations that his writing seems closer in temper to the tradition of Ruskin and Pater — that is to say, a tradition of fine writing suffused with self and appreciation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABOUT LOOKING by John Berger
NON-FICTION
Released: April 25, 1980

"A messier, more Procrustean critic would be hard to find, farfetched as often as he is just; yet Berger always holds your interest—which, considering the present state of art criticism, is no mean accomplishment."
Britain's John Berger has got to be the widest-ranging Marxist art critic around; and in these 23 assorted essays, 1966-79, he almost apotheosizes into a butterfly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ISABELLE by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 1998

"This quirky volume, which is sparsely but handsomely illustrated with its subject's own line drawings, is flawed by occasional Middle Eastern mystical fatuousness, but nevertheless offers a crisp, intriguing portrait of an extraordinarily enigmatic and interesting woman."
Subtitled A Story in Shots, this trim "novel" is in fact a screenplay whose scenes describe the brief, impassioned life of 19th-century traveler and adventuress Isabelle Eberhardt. Read full book review >