Search Results: "John Bierhorst"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WAY OF THE EARTH by John Bierhorst
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 1, 1994

"Index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
From a master historian, folklorist, and anthropologist, a lucid, densely fact-filled argument for Native Americans' theories and practices of preserving the environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IS MY FRIEND AT HOME? by John Bierhorst
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 12, 2001

"A detailed note on sources is included. (Picture book folklore. 4+)"
This delightful and unusual collection of trickster tales was originally told in the Hopi pueblos of Arizona in the wintertime, "especially after dark when the Sun was traveling under the earth." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUMOR
Released: May 19, 1992

"Unique. (Folklore. 8+)"
Incredible as it is, Native American riddles have never before been gathered together in a book; there's even been some scholarly doubt that native riddling traditions exist on this side of the Atlantic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: April 1, 1994

"List of tribes and cultures. (Folklore/Picture book. 6+)"
How gratifying to have one of Bierhorst's peerless anthologies in picture-book format: 50-odd lullabies, night songs, and prayers of peoples from the Arctic to Paraguay, arranged in thematic groups showing how various cultures have celebrated the beauty and mystery of sunset, the heavenly bodies, night creatures, and the sacred darkness in which the Creator moves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOMAN WHO FELL FROM THE SKY by John Bierhorst
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 16, 1993

"Most satisfying to look at, to read aloud, or to hear. (Folklore/Picture book. 5+)"
From a distinguished editor and translator of Native American lore (most recently, Lightning Inside You, 1992), a simple but dramatically retold creation myth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1998

"In addition to offering sources and lists of stories by theme, Bierhorst imbues the tellings with a sense of the immediacy: Their raw charm shines through. (b&w illustrations, not seen; bibliography, notes) (Folklore. 10-12)"
Bierhorst (The Dancing Fox, 1997, etc.) has gathered 22 tales from the First Peoples of America, from the Inuit to the Maya, Cherokee, Zuni, Seneca, and Lenape, among others, focusing on the little people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DANCING FOX by John Bierhorst
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Few children will want to read it cover to cover on their own; the stories, if diverting, are unembellished, and readers raised on the tidy endings of European folktales and the pithy morals of Aesop may find these selections brusque. (b&w illustrations, notes, bibliography) (Folklore. 10+)"
A scholarly collection of traditional stories from the Inuit cultures of Alaska, Canada, and Greenland, expertly edited by Bierhorst (The Way of the Earth, 1994, etc.), who includes an extensive introduction to the Inuit, as well as thoroughly annotated notes on each story and a listing of references. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROAD TRIPPIN’ IT WITH JOHN BURNINGHAM
by Julie Danielson

The holidays are nigh. I wrote this time last year about my favorite holiday picture book of all time – John Burningham’s Harvey Slumfenburger’s Christmas Present, originally published back in 1993.

I’m a big Burningham fan. (If you are, too, and you’ve not yet read this, run to your nearest bookstore or library.) And in thinking about Harvey, I was ...


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BLOG POST

JOHN NEWMAN
by Rhett Morgan

In 1992, John Newman prepared to celebrate finishing his Ph.D., securing a book deal with Warner Books for the release of his dissertation, JFK and Vietnam, and having worked directly with Oliver Stone as consultant on the film JFK. But a brief call from the National Security Agency put all of that in jeopardy. Newman was warned that his ...


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BLOG POST

JOHN T. EDGE
by Megan Labrise

John T. Edge’s The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South is no mere paean to peanuts, homage to hominy, and laudation to lard. Like the nutritive broth for which it’s named, this title is more substantive than it appears at a glance.

“One the primary aims of my book,” says Edge, a native Georgian who lives ...


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