Search Results: "John Cheever"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1958

"Watch and ward for the touch-me-nots."
Seven stories provide wall to wall suburbia-cum-nightmare for this collection — 1953-1958 from The New Yorker — which offs the best as did his earlier short stories and his award winner The Wapshot Chronicle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAPSHOT SCANDAL by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 1963

"But his admirers will again be fascinated by this new book, unstructured as it may be, with its passionate sense of life, its disconsolate awareness of loss, and its writing, much of which is remarkable, and, a word to be used charily, beautiful."
Not dependent on the award-winning Chronicle (1958), this continues the picaresque experiences of the surviving members of the family, Miss Honora, Coverly and Moses; whose egregious eccentricity was a more prominent feature of the earlier took. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 12, 1961

"As before, Cheever remains — for many — a challenge."
A collection of nine episodes, ranging from the stinging to the bleak, and including a Mllany of Characters TWNAIMN, comes from Esquire and The New Yorker and emphasize, once more, Cheever's ability to underline modern chaos, sometimes with terror, sometimes with pity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JOURNALS OF JOHN CHEEVER by John Cheever
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 9, 1991

"More so than his letters, these journals remind us that Cheever has earned his place among the modern masters."
New Yorker editor Robert Gottlieb, in consultation with the Cheever family, here adds to the six excerpts from Cheever's journals that originally ran in the magazine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD OF APPLES by John Cheever
Released: May 1, 1973

"Cheerer story a rara avis — a bird that can fly on one wing if necessary."
It would be hard to think of a more casual or disarming writer than John Cheerer whose stories — this is his first collection in nine years — begin with those marvelously underhanded first lines: "The subject today will be the metaphysics of obesity, and I am the belly of a man named Lawrence Farnsworth" or "Reminiscence, along with the cheese boards and ugly pottery sometimes given to brides, seems to have a manifest destiny with the sea." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BULLET PARK by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 28, 1969

"A twilight tale filled with the sweet, sad, muffled mystery of existence and there will be recognitions and reverberations for everyone."
Bullet Park is in the heart of the Cheever country, landscaped with $65,000 houses, with gardens and golf courses and swimming pools, with empty bottles and full ashtrays, as well as the less definable malaise of the mid-century middle class man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAPSHOT CHRONICLE by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1957

"Watch the critics."
In a patchwork of family life is the pattern of Captain Leander's belief in the "unobserved ceremoniousness" of life which is a "gesture and sacrament toward the excellence and continuousness of things" and through parts of his diary, episodes in St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALCONER by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1977

"Though the fate of Farragut and Falconer may be open-ended, Cheever's novel is a strong fix—a statement of the human condition, a parable of salvation."
It is many years since we left the Steuben glasshouse world that was, so unmistakably, Cheerer country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN CHEEVER by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2009

"Attention must be paid, and glasses should be raised in tribute and gratitude to it."
Despite the early acceptance of John Cheever (1912-82) as a writer of short stories for prestigious magazines (the New Republic, the New Yorker), he struggled for decades to support a growing family and earn critical respect (both of these goals were realized, in spades, in his later years). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 23, 1953

"If there is no point of satiation for the short story reader, this is for the selective."
Civilized humanity, not at its best, is seen with a sensivity to discord and a feeling for contemporary conflict in these 14 stories collected from the New Yorker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF JOHN CHEEVER by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 1978

"But, if those earlier collections are not within reach, this mamoth grouping of small, polished pleasures is a luxurious necessity."
Sixty-one stories which—notwithstanding Cheever's four novels from The Wapshot Chronicle to Falconer—are the rock formation upon which his reputation truly rests. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIRTEEN UNCOLLECTED STORIES by John Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1994

"At best, middle-brow fiction in the O'Hara-Cozzens mold."
After years of litigation between the publisher and Cheever's estate, this collection of 13 stories now in the public domain proves something of a disappointment. Read full book review >