Search Results: "John David Geib"


BOOK REVIEW

Beyond Beliefs by John David Geib
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 30, 2013

"A thought-provoking theological work that will provide even skeptics with a compelling intellectual argument."
A search for permanent meaning in a world where modernity can potentially obscure reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MINION by John David Anderson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 24, 2014

"This novel should make Anderson's parents proud, even if they threw away his comics when he was little. His readers will just be happy. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Parents: Be warned. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HELPFUL ALPHABET OF FRIENDLY OBJECTS by John Updike
ABC BOOKS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"As John Updike ably demonstrates, writing an alphabet book is an opportunity no serious novelist can afford to miss. (Picture book/poetry. 3-8)"
ABC poems and photos by a father-and-son team. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 21, 1990

An engaging and generally instructive guide to succeeding in business, which draws its object lessons mainly from the author's offbeat career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANCTIFIED BLUES by Mable John
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 13, 2006

"Over the top, but many readers will go wild for this gospel-spouting, life-affirming story."
From beginning to end, the Lord is the most significant character in this determined, lively novel, a spiritually confident first collaboration between music author Ritz (Howling at the Moon, 2003, etc.) and R&B-singer-turned-minister John. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCH TO THE SEA by David Weber
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Another doorstopper with abundant action, lively if predictable complications, and no end in sight: thinly stretched and increasingly tedious."
Sequel—or, better, the second installment of what has metamorphosed into a series—to March Upcountry (p. 372). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 2, 2004

"Mavens will mourn the dearth of move-by-move analysis, but general readers will savor a marvelous portrait of East against West, with perceived societal superiority as the real prize."
The BBC journalists who honed their skills in amassing minutiae with Wittgenstein's Poker (2001) re-create the furor surrounding a chess match that was also one of the Cold War's most bizarre confrontations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1996

"In this regard, Skrentny's book, for those willing to expend the effort, is an interesting examination of policymaking and adds important context to the affirmative action debate."
A provocative examination of affirmative action as a policymaking paradigm, by sociologist Skrentny (Univ. of Pennsylvania). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DUNGEONEERS by John David Anderson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 23, 2015

"Readers may well feel that the wait in between battles and heists feels a little too much like school. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Even a school for rogues is, at its core, a school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIDEKICKED by John David Anderson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2013

"In the end, the tale is so heartbreaking that it's the perfect training manual for superheroes everywhere. And that means all of us. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
Comic-book fans like to talk about how much they hate sidekicks. No one dreams about being Robin. They want to grow up to be Batman. But it turns out that a sidekick is the perfect metaphor for adolescence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET'S HAVE A TREE PARTY! by David Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 13, 2012

"Not to be a party pooper, but this bash requires too much extra work from the reader to make it a success. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Grandpa Crow is having a party, and the whole forest is invited, throughout the day and night. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANDARD HERO BEHAVIOR by John David Anderson
ADVENTURE
Released: Nov. 19, 2007

"Take this Easy Quiz and Find Out') and inept but promising verse, Anderson dishes up a debut that's in the same vein as Gerald Morris's Arthurian tales, though less polished. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
A light tone overlays serious undercurrents in this leisurely but entertaining fantasy. Read full book review >