Search Results: "John David Mann"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 18, 2011

"A welcome jolt of optimism."
Burrus (Technotrends: How to Use Technology to Go Beyond Your Competition, 1993) anticipates a technology-driven recovery for the U.S. economy that will overshadow the transformations of the past 25 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 20, 2011

"Hardly a gripping tale, but as a paradigm for those struggling to make their way in the world of corporate sales, it could prove somewhat enlightening."
An entertaining parable that could help hone business skills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"An enjoyable and insightful read for anyone interested in increasing their personal and professional effectiveness."
A modern, holistic approach to leadership, framed around a commitment to authenticity, the ability to listen and an awareness of the feelings of employees and constituencies. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

A READING YEAR: JUDGING CRIME WORKS BY DIFFERENT STANDARDS
by J. Kingston Pierce

Back when I began writing for Kirkus Reviews, almost half a decade ago, I had an editor who was frequently after me to publish lists of things—rundowns of especially dependable crime novelists, or books I’d like to read again for the first time, or once-popular detectives about whom I thought more should be written. “People like to read lists,” ...


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BLOG POST

ROAD TRIPPIN’ IT WITH JOHN BURNINGHAM
by Julie Danielson

The holidays are nigh. I wrote this time last year about my favorite holiday picture book of all time – John Burningham’s Harvey Slumfenburger’s Christmas Present, originally published back in 1993.

I’m a big Burningham fan. (If you are, too, and you’ve not yet read this, run to your nearest bookstore or library.) And in thinking about Harvey, I was ...


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POST-APOCALYPTIC FICTION. TOO SOON?
by Karen Schechner

The collective love for post-apocalyptic fiction might have dipped a bit since The Handmaid’s Tale started to hew too closely to reality. But it’s an irresistible subgenre. For those looking for more depictions of a frightening, all-too-plausible future run by religious zealots hungry for control, The Seekers series, by David Litwack, may suit.  

In the series’ debut, The Children ...


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BOOK REVIEW

Pleomorph by John Paul Mann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 2014

"Convoluted at times, but overall a fun ride."
The threat of war—both conventional and biological—involving the United States, Russia, and China looms large in Mann's debut thriller. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

HE MAKES HIS STAND IN THE AUDITORIUM
by Sarah Pitre

 

BOOK REPORT for Hold Me Closer: The Tiny Cooper Story by David Levithan

Cover Story: Fabulous
BFF Charm: Extra Sparkly Platinum
Swoonworthy Scale: 3
Talky Talk: The Script
Bonus Factors: LGBTQ, Musical
Relationship Status: Season Ticket Holder

 

Cover Story: Fabulous

Since this book is written as a script, the cover is extremely fitting. But the most appropriate aspect ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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DAVID LEVITHAN CHANGES THE WORLD ONE KISS AT A TIME
by Sarah Pitre

 

 

BOOK REPORT for Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan  

Cover Story: PDAA
BFF Charm: Make It Rain
Swoonworthy Scale: 6
Talky Talk:  Whimsically Weighty
Bonus Factors: Diversity, World Record, YA Inside Joke
Relationship Status: Revolutionary

Cover Story: PDAA

Normally, when I see two people kissing on a cover, I consider it a defacement of the ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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