Search Results: "John Gardner"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 23, 2004

"Primarily of interest to devoted fans and those who knew Gardner."
Breezy appreciation by Silesky (Ferlinghetti, 1990, etc.), presenting the novelist as less an "outlaw" than a conventional man with a modest talent, a fierce drive, and a gift for self-destruction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AVA GARDNER by Lee Server
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 18, 2006

"Overlong, yet never dull. Server writes with a contagious enthusiasm for his subject and a solid grasp of Hollywood history that Ava's fans and film buffs will enjoy."
Little falls on the cutting room floor is this full-dress biography of a screen icon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AVA GARDNER by Ava Gardner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 2, 2013

"Juicy, but it leaves a nasty aftertaste."
Based on the movie star's late-night ramblings, an unvarnished account of her marriages and affairs in golden-age Hollywood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN by Niall Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Irish novelist Williams (Four Letters of Love, 1999, etc.) takes spiritual issues seriously—and continues to write compellingly about them."
John the Apostle, now a revered Master in exile with a small band of Christian brothers on the island of Patmos, confronts heresy, schism and doubt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2009

"An enjoyable true-crime tale accessible to lovers of art and whodunits alike."
U.S. News and World Report contributing editor Boser provides a rich account of his attempt to unravel the mystery of the world's largest unsolved art theft. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER AT THE GARDNER  by Jane Langton
Released: Feb. 23, 1988

"This is one not to miss."
The author of several stories featuring retired ex-cop (now Harvard lecturer) Homer Kelly (Natural Enemy, etc.) reveals unexpected strengths and charm in this new work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDDY'S BOOK by John Gardner
Released: March 1, 1980

"Here his lumbering counterattacks and homilies pummel away whatever surface charms the story has, making this a stiff little diversion (illustrated by Daniel Biamonte) of interest mainly to tireless observers of book-world bickering."
Gardner's belief in the primacy of tale-telling (see Moral Fiction) is so firm that he doesn't mind telling us that this tale isn't exactly his own: "A key event in Freddy's Book (King Gustav and the Devil) is drawn from a tale in Mark Helprin's collection, A Dove of the East and Other Stories," explains the prefatory note. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRENDEL by John Gardner
Released: Sept. 17, 1971

"At the close one is not sure if the savior is 'blithe of his deed,' but Gardner, the word-pleaser, should be."
As in Resurrection (1966) and The Wreckage of Agathon (1970) Gardner demonstrates his agility at juggling metaphysical notions while telling a diverting tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON WRITERS AND WRITING by John Gardner
Released: April 1, 1994

"It sounds so intelligent."
By the time he died in a motorcycle crash in 1982, novelist John Gardner had distinguished himself as a candid, thoughtful critic of his fellow fiction writers who wasn't embarrassed to write a manifesto, On Moral Fiction (1978), that argued against purely aesthetic, formal judgments of literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICKELSSON'S GHOSTS by John Gardner
Released: June 1, 1982

"In all: a fascinating, oddly depressing failure."
One of Gardner's longest novels, most personal, most ambitious—and alas, too, the most shambling and ultimately incredible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 11, 1976

"Disappointing."
Gardner's second quartet of stories for children licks the sparkle of last year's Dragon, Dragon but suffers from the same coyness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASON AND MEDEIA by John Gardner
Released: June 1, 1973

"Perhaps, after all, encounters with antiquity are better left to Europeans."
John Gardner is a writer of great energy and intellectual inventiveness, saturated in an imagination addicted to myth, mostly the existential sort, man creating his own myths about the self, about order, about love, as the world surrounding him falls to pieces, becomes increasingly chaotic or mindless or threatening. Read full book review >