Search Results: "John Gribbin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 1993

"As usual, Gribbin does a snappy reprise of the relevant theories and history before the whoosh and wow take over."
Not only is there another universe next door, but myriad others across the eons of time and space: That's one conclusion voiced here by this former Stephen Hawking student and popularizer of astronomy (Unveiling the Edge of Time, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1981

"Ultimately, then, a book that pleases for many things the author does well, but one to be tempered by dipping into other sources for other points of view."
Gribbin is a knowledgeable scientist (with a degree in astrophysics from Cambridge) and a competent expositor (with several popular books on astronomy behind him)—as well as ambitious and optimistic, as anyone attempting a one-volume history of man and the universe would have to be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2000

"Close attention is required, but the fascinating story Gribbin has to tell is worth the effort."
How old is the universe? The answer (and the story of how the answer was determined) is the subject of this demanding but not overwhelming account of astronomers at work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 5, 1999

"A clear and comprehensive popular treatment of the cutting edge of physics."
Physics changes so rapidly that a new survey of its landmarks is necessary every few years; here's an update from a popular British science writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 8, 2016

"An exciting chronicle of a monumental scientific accomplishment by a scientist who participated in the measuring of the age of the universe."
Astrophysicist Gribbin (Erwin Schrodinger and the Quantum Revolution, 2013, etc.) clearly explains how the accidental discovery of "the cosmic microwave background radiation" in the mid-1960s led to the assignment of a definitive date for the origin of the universe.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 22, 1994

"But please, Einstein's life needs no apology!"
The same team that brought you Stephen Hawking: A life in Science has decided to defend Albert Einstein against assorted revisionist treatments. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RICHARD FEYNMAN by John Gribbin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 21, 1997

"Flaws, yes, but still a fine diamond of a life, well polished by the Gribbin team."
Another Feynman biography? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 15, 1989

"A heady introduction to a complex subject."
Suddenly, anthropic cosmology—which speculates on the relationship between scientific law and human life—is all the rage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 1992

"A fascinating story overall, with the added plus that White and Gribbin are able to translate Hawking's bestselling A Brief History of Time for those who bought the book but found it incomprehensible."
White (Director of Science Studies/d'Overbroeck's College, Oxford) and Gribbin (Cosmic Coincidences, 1989, etc.) have produced a definitive biography of arguably the best-known cosmologist in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEATH OF THE SUN by John Gribbin
Released: March 3, 1980

"Lively and discussable—by pros as well as armchair astronomers."
Gribbin, a glib expositor of things astronomical, dons his speculative robes to predict some cold turns for the earth and the sun in the coming decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1977

"An essay, 'Is Our Sun a Normal Star,' added as an appendix, is a little marvel of provocative suggestions, tease, and, yes, entertainment."
Will our galaxy turn into a quasar? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"For these freethinking folk, this is a book that rejoices in paradoxes and delights in reporting that nothing bizarre—baby universes, bubble universes, universe-sized black holes, energy extraction and time travel through wormholes—is denied by the laws of physics."
The first half of this latest from prolific English science- writer Gribbin (Cosmic Coincidences, 1989, etc.) is a nice reprise of special and general relativity, complete with credit to some early scientists who thought about dark and dense matter centuries before black holes were named. Read full book review >