Search Results: "John Hassett"


BOOK REVIEW

TOO MANY FROGS! by Ann Hassett
ANIMALS
Released: July 11, 2011

"Young listeners will quickly memorize the story and then focus on everything else that is happening in proximity to Nana Quimby's latest eccentric encounter with wildlife. (Picture book. 2-6)"
It's a modern-day plague of frogs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT UP A TREE by John Hassett
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Children won't be able to resist the temptation to count them, and few will quibble with the notion that when it comes to cat-and-mouse, turnabout is fair play. (Picture book. 5-7)"
The Hassetts (Charles of the Wild, 1997, etc.) skewer unhelpful neighbors and public servants with this pointed and witty picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOUSE IN THE HOUSE by Ann Hassett
ANIMALS
Released: March 29, 2004

"Spirited, folksy art. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Stylized, attractively odd paintings show a family progress through a sequence of animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN’T CATCH ME by John Hassett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2006

"While the refrain is not especially catchy, the illustrations carry it off, and this could be just right on a hot summer day. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The Gingerbread Man gets a summery update in this latest from the Hassetts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODNIGHT BOB by Ann Hassett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"A sweetly simple bedtime book with a reassuring message. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A young child's bedtime anxiety is quelled as familiar friends take turns saying goodnight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NINE LIVES OF DUDLEY DOG by Ann Hassett
ANIMALS
Released: March 21, 2008

"Inventive but faulty. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sister wanted a cat for her birthday but what she got was Dudley, the cat-obsessed dog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FINEST CHRISTMAS TREE by Ann Hassett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 24, 2005

"The illustrations in wintry, cool tones have a naïve flavor with flattened perspective recalling the winter scenes of Grandma Moses. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Farmer Tuttle runs a Christmas tree farm in the New England mountains of the late 1950s, at the time when fake trees come into style. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COME BACK, BEN by Ann Hassett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Hello, Ben! We're glad you're here. (Early reader. 4-6)"
This excellent early reader will send new readers' confidence soaring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOB'S ROCK by Ann Hassett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2017

"The controlled vocabulary and repetition make this picture book a good segue for fledgling readers. (Picture book. 5-6)"
Young Bob, introduced in Goodnight Bob (2016), is content to play with his pet rock while friend Max is frustrated by his dog's unresponsive behavior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE SILLY GIRLS GRUBB by John Hassett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 2002

"Snip, snap, snout, a good turnabout. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Those three Billy goats have been transformed into young girls and the troll morphed into a mean boy in this retelling of the classic folktale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHARLES OF THE WILD by John Hassett
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"An engaging and very doggy story from the Hassetts (We Got My Brother at the Zoo, 1995). (Picture book. 6-7)"
In an exuberant paean to freedom, a pampered house dog hears the call of the wild, but can only dream longingly of running with the wolves and howling with coyotes until an open window offers escape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SONG OF THE DISTANT ROOT by Elizabeth Subercaseaux
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"One finds oneself wishing, metafictionally, that she—rather than the earnest Elizabeth Subercaseaux—had written this book."
In this oppressively magical-realist novella, Salustio, a self-styled Utopian visionary, "dreams" a village where freedom and equality flourish, and—rather like St.-Exupéry's Little Prince—goes in search of it, meeting en route many self-consciously symbolic figures (including, wouldn't you know it, a priest who converses with birds). Read full book review >